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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I have a MIDI keyboard instrument that was working on my Win7 x64 machine, with proper drivers, and then it just stopped. I get this error message "Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)". Oddly it works on an XP machine I tried, while it fails on other Win7 and Vista machines I've tried. Could this device have gotten damaged? If so, is there any way to have it detected in Win7, considering it works in XP still?

If anyone is wondering it's a Yamaha ez-250i keyboard instrument.

Also, I used a 12 foot usb cord. I remember reading something about USB only being designed for 6 feet or so, could this have damaged the device? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The USB is designed for 6 feet and only six feet.The yamaha ez-250i keyboard instrument is formatted for USA. and for windows xp.
Do you have a source you can give on "USB is designed for 6 feet and only six feet"? Just wondering. Why do companies even produce 12 feet long USB cables or 6 foot USB extension cables for that matter?

Yamaha has 64 bit Windows 7 drivers on their site for this exact keyboard.
http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musi..._lighted_fret_instruments/ez-250i/?mode=model
Sorry I can't directly link it--it's under support if you click the link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well after reformatting my computer it has seemed to detect the MIDI keyboard correctly now. I'm wondering if this was brought about because I do not safely remove the USB device. If this is the case and the driver gets corrupt, how could I delete the driver, given windows detects the device as a malfunctioning USB device, still? Thanks.
 

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The USB 2.0 and 3.0 specifications do not specify a maximum cable length directly. A USB cable may be any length so long as it meets all of the other requirements, with the most important being signal attenuation, timing, and voltage loss on the wires that carry power. The maximum length quoted from the USB FAQ is 5 meters.
 
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