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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi i have a ipower backard bell pc for gaming and i am going to be getting
a zotac GTX 470, i have a sort of plug for the speaker to take the power from the pc as well.
I have been told i have a 750 watts from pc world. How did he work this out, here are the specs.

FSP GROUP INC
model number FSP750-80GLN
AC input: 100-240V-,12-5A,50-60HZ
DC output:+3.3V - 30.oA(ORG). +5 -30.oA(red)

+12V1 - 20.oA(yel/blue).
+12V2 - 20.oA(yel/white)
+12V3 - 20.oA(yel).+12V4 - 20.oA(yel/blk)
+5Vsb - 3.0A(purp)

If some one could tell me how this works and what it mean ill be very greatfull

Thank you.
 

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You have a 750W FSP pw supply. FSP is a good mfg. To answer your question, watt is a unit of electrical power. There is a very simple equation for determining watts VxA=W or volts times amps equal watts. Voltage is electrical pressure, amps is a measure of electrical volume. As an example you can have a high voltage and very low amperage [as in the ignition system for your car] thousands of volts but only a very small fraction of an amp. This will give you a shock but not kill you. The battery in your car has 12V and very high amp rating. It will not shock you however short the terminals with metal and you can burn yourself.

As you up the voltage, you need less amperage to do the same work. If it takes 1200 watts to run a given electrical device, you can use 120V house current @10 amps OR you could use 240V @ 5 amp; same amount of wattage or power.

That is probably as clear as mud however do some reading and learning about electrical theory and it will make more sense.
 
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