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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hiya.

OK, I want to connect to my small business network from my home computer. I have read the support articles on microsoft.com, but they confuse me, and sometimes use terms I'm not familiar with (all of the acronyms just waste me!:confused: ).

I have high-speed cable and a D-Link router at each location. My home network (dhcp from ISP) has one hard-wired (XP Home), and two wireless units (XP Home and ME). My workplace network (static address from ISP) has one wired (XP Pro), and 4 wireless units (3 x XP Home and 1 ME). All XP machines are SP2.

I could list the things I have done and tried, but I think it would be easier if someone would just take me by the hand and lead me through what I have to do, step by step.:eek: It's my understanding that as long as one of the work 'puters is XP Pro, I should be able to do this.:up: I believe I have to set the routers to access the internal networks as well.

OK, I can create the connection from my home unit through Settings/Control Panel/Network Connections, name it, and save it. What now?

I really appreciate the help.:D

TBF
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
25 hits, no reply. Hmm, have I broken some protocol?

Bump!
 

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The BOBS Fan said:
it would be easier if someone would just take me by the hand and lead me through what I have to do, step by step.:eek:
What you're asking for isn't that easy, but can be done in a few ways... Do you have a server at work or just a peer network?

RDP (remote desktop protocol) - forward port 3389 to a computer or server inside your business network. Not the best practice to forward any ports to your network but the option is there. Just remember, if you can get access to your server via rdp, anyone can. Be sure your passwords are strong.

2- vpn -
If you have a server, you can create a VPN server which allows direct, secure connections to your server from anywhere. But again, you need to forward ports to your server.
-or-
you can purchase a couple of VPN hardware firewalls to create a site to site tunnel from your office to your home network. This type of link will always exist (providing your internet doesn't go down) giving full time access to your network. Cost is a little more but it's much more secure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No server.

Don't think I like the RDP option.

Isn't XP set up to do this securely?
 

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RDP is secure because it's all encrypted anyway though a VPN is more secure. You have to setup the work computer to act as a VPN server. Windows XP Pro will act as a VPN server but only one user can connect to the VPN at a time. Once you've configured it to act as a VPN server and you've configured the Windows firewall to allow that you have to forward port 1723 (also port 500 if you decide to use IPSEC but it's not necessary) to the computer acting as a VPN server and you should check to make sure that PPTP passthrough (ipsec passthrough if you decide to use that) is enabled on both your work and your home routers. If you want to access the work computer's desktop then you also want to enable remote desktop on that machine as well.
On your home computer you want to create a VPN dial up connection that connects to your work computer. For this connection to work you need either a static IP at the work location or you need to setup something like dyndns to update the dns records when your IP changes. The instructions on how to do all of the above is available on the internet
For help understanding acronyms I use webopedia.com and if I want to learn about a concept I go to Wikipedia first then other spots like whatis.com, howstuffworks, and about.com. You should learn to use these sites and increase your knowledge because all of the instructions I've given you here exist already in multiple places and we geeks (though I can't speak for the moderators and owners of this forum) like to help someone advance their skills and learning not do all the work for them.
Lots of sites and information out there; have fun.

P.S. The first thing I think when someone says they've tried everything for an issue like this which isn't really a problem it's just reading the directions is that somebody didn't do their homework. ;)

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input. My problem with acronyms is that I'm dyslexic. Keeping track of them is quite a chore anyway, much more so with my problem. Guess I shoulda explained that!

I have used the sites you mention. I must point out that I did not say I had tried everything. I said I did not list everything I had tried. I've been working on this for weeks, thanks, so completing the task will be a learning experience. That's why I came here, because I know the help is real, and I support the site monetarily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
DLink DI-514 (h), WBR-1310 (w)

Unikfellow gave me enough to *think* that I can accomplish connection on Tuesday -- we'll see.

Sorry, the article didn't help me. But thanks. I'm OK with the routers, I think.
 

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The BOBS Fan said:
Thanks for the input. My problem with acronyms is that I'm dyslexic. Keeping track of them is quite a chore anyway, much more so with my problem. Guess I shoulda explained that!

I have used the sites you mention. I must point out that I did not say I had tried everything. I said I did not list everything I had tried. I've been working on this for weeks, thanks, so completing the task will be a learning experience. That's why I came here, because I know the help is real, and I support the site monetarily.
Sorry, I meant no offense and did not mean to imply you were some kind of leach. I just like to encourage self learning.
Glad to help any way I can.
Have fun. :)

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
NP! Actually, I'm glad I revised my post before sending it (after all, there's no way I could know anything about your love life, or lack of it!:) ). I appreciate the time you folks volunteer to the site, and I understand you may get alot of questions that could be self answered. In fact, I always do some thread research to avoid such a question myself.:up: This one has been a poser for me, however, no matter how easy it *should* be! Your post helped -- I'll let you know Tuesday where I stand.:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
By the way, I do have a linux server on the network -- can it access a windows-based box?
 

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Yes, but you'll need to learn about Samba. If you use FAT32 on the Windows box you can use Samba but if you use NTFS then I think the best you'll get is read access because Microsoft's eula explicitly prohibits anyone from reverse engineering the filesystem and Windows protocols even for compatibility purposes.

Joe
 

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Bob Cerelli said:
A Linux computer can easily access a Windows computer using NTFS. Just like a Win98 computer can, even though neither can support it on their own. It is the Windows computer that is doing the file saving, not Linux or Win98.
I don't understand that, do you know of any references that explains that?

Joe
 

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Don't need any references to prove that. I just walked over to a machine running W98SE and accessed the NTFS disk partition on my server with no issue. My Linux machine also can access it with no issue.

That's the way networking works. :)
 

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I'm not looking for proof I'm looking to understand how that's possible. It's not like that for everything, for example, Linux couldn't access Windows shares until Samba came around and until they learned to use the smb protocol, also, PCs can't access Mac shares without special software (this is pre OSX) so it's not just that as long as all computers can use TCP/IP they can interact with each other. The OSI model can explain that a little better than I can.

Joe
 

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When you make a network request to a remote system, it requests the remote system to supply the data from the disk. It's up to the remote system to know how to access the data. You can have a single file server with multiple disk formats all shared, and they'll appear identically to the remote system, it doesn't really care how you manage the data.
 

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CoolHandJoe CoolHandJoe,

This is to clear up the misinformation regarding the following about Linux accessing a share on a Windows computer that has a NTFS formatted drive:

UNIKSERV said:
If you use FAT32 on the Windows box you can use Samba but if you use NTFS then I think the best you'll get is read access because Microsoft's eula explicitly prohibits anyone from reverse engineering the filesystem and Windows protocols even for compatibility purposes.
You need Samba either way on the Linux computer.

But what is incorrect is the information regarding NTFS and Linux. Over a network, you don't necessarily only need FAT32. You can easily access a NTFS shared directory on a Windows computer over a network from a Linux one. No reverse engineering is needed for compatibility purposes.
 
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