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In November 2021, NASA extended the service contract for Hubble until June 2026. Support beyond 2026 is unknown. Still Hubble could have an equipment problem and fail any time. That became apparent when Hubble was down from June until December 2021 because of hardware problems. If Hubble fails then it would have to be decided whether a repair mission was worth it. Currently there are no plans.

Based on solar activity and atmospheric drag, or lack thereof, a natural atmospheric reentry for Hubble will occur between 2028 and 2040. If NASA decided that it wanted to de-orbit Hubble before then it would have to plan a mission to it to attach a rocket motor to it so a planned de-orbit could be done.

When we lose Hubble there is another telescope in the works called the Roman Space Telescope.

NASA has chosen SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket to launch its next major space telescope, a wide-field observatory that should directly complement the brand new James Webb Space Telescope.

Originally known as the Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST), NASA recently renamed the mission in honor of Nancy Grace Roman, a foundational force behind the Hubble Space Telescope. Fittingly, the Roman Space Telescope's basic design is reminiscent of Hubble in many ways, owing to the fact that the mission exists solely because the US National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) chose to donate an unused multi-billion-dollar spy satellite - a satellite that was effectively a secret Earth-facing version of Hubble.

However, thanks to decades of improvements in electronics, electromechanics, and the instrumentation side of spacecraft and space telescopes, RST will be dramatically more capable than the Hubble telescope it resembles. And now, after a several-year fight for survival, the Roman Space Telescope officially has a ride to space - SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket.
SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket to launch NASA's Roman Space Telescope
https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-falcon-heavy-nasa-roman-space-telescope/
 

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James Webb Space Telescope beats its own record with potential most distant galaxies


Astronomers are now discovering record-breaking distant galaxies by the dozen while sifting through the treasure trove of data now being collected by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST or Webb). Among them are several galaxies dating back to just over 200 million years after the Big Bang.

Prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, the most distant confirmed galaxy known was GN-z11, which astronomers saw as it was about 420 million years after the Big Bang, giving it what astronomers call a redshift of 11.6. (Redshift describes how much the light coming from a galaxy has been stretched as the universe expands. The higher the redshift, the farther back in time we see a galaxy.)
 

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South Korea to Send Its First Mission to the Moon


On Tuesday, August 2, a South Korean spacecraft carrying scientific instruments will launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and begin charting a course to the moon.

The spacecraft is expected to arrive at its destination in mid-December and enter an orbit about 100 kilometers above the lunar surface, where its instruments will study the moon for at least a year, reports ScienceInsider's Dennis Normile.
 

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At Long Last, Mathematical Proof That Black Holes Are Stable


In 1963, the mathematician Roy Kerr found a solution to Einstein's equations that precisely described the space-time outside what we now call a rotating black hole. (The term wouldn't be coined for a few more years.) In the nearly six decades since his achievement, researchers have tried to show that these so-called Kerr black holes are stable. What that means, explained Jérémie Szeftel, a mathematician at Sorbonne University, "is that if I start with something that looks like a Kerr black hole and give it a little bump" - by throwing some gravitational waves at it, for instance - "what you expect, far into the future, is that everything will settle down, and it will once again look exactly like a Kerr solution."
 

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FCC votes to boost manufacturing in space


The FCC may have just advanced the industrialization of space. Commissioners have voted in favor of an inquiry that will explore in-space servicing, assembly and manufacturing (ISAM). The move would both help officials understand the demands and risks of current in-space production technology while facilitating new projects. This could help companies build satellites and stations in orbit, for instance, while finding new ways to deal with growing volumes of space debris.
 

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A good read.. :cool:


NASA Team Troubleshoots Asteroid-Bound Lucy Across Millions of Miles


Following the successful launch of NASA's Lucy spacecraft on Oct. 16, 2021, a group of engineers huddled around a long conference table in Titusville, Florida. Lucy was mere hours into its 12-year flight, but an unexpected challenge had surfaced for the first-ever Trojan asteroids mission.

Data indicated that one of Lucy's solar arrays powering the spacecraft's systems - designed to unfurl like a hand fan - hadn't fully opened and latched, and the team was figuring out what to do next.
 

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China launches secretive reusable test spacecraft


China sent a highly-classified reusable experimental spacecraft into orbit Thursday, two years after a similarly clandestine mission.

A Long March 2F rocket lifted off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in the Gobi Desert Aug. 4, sending a "reusable test space" into low Earth orbit, Chinese language state media Xinhua reported.
 

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Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough Confirmed: California Team Achieved Ignition


Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) National Ignition Facility (NIF) recorded the first case of ignition on August 8, 2021, the results of which have now been published in three peer-reviewed papers.

Nuclear fusion is the process that powers the Sun and other stars: heavy hydrogen atoms collide with enough force that they fuse together to form a helium atom, releasing large amounts of energy as a by-product. Once the hydrogen plasma "ignites", the fusion reaction becomes self-sustaining, with the fusions themselves producing enough power to maintain the temperature without external heating.
 

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I agree and when you think about it, we've lived through some amazing technological times.. :up:
My dad's mom had the Wright Brothers flight AND saw men walk on the moon in her life, and I find that cool as all get out. This is the stuff OUR grandkids will talk about and that is just so awesome. Wish I could see what THEIR grandkids will find astounding.
 
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