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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


System Information software in windows 10 shows that my BIOS is "Legacy"

I can access SSD and have installed OS(Windows 10) there.


So, how do I get uefi boot and make SSD be seen there? And out of all those options, which one is SSD? Internal HDD? Onboard NIC? System device bay?

My laptop is dell inspiron 15 5567, and it had 1TB Toshiba hard disk. I added Crucial MX500 1TB SSD to it.

I want to convert this to UEFI, how should I do that?


I'm hearing that I should get GPT, UEFI with secure boot etc but I'm not sure of the order to do things and a basic tutorial for it. I want to get the most authentic information, that's why I came here.
 

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Dell Inspiron 15 5567 Notebook PC (support site)

You say you added a Crucial 1 TB SSD to the Toshiba 1 TB HDD that is already inside your notebook?
Your notebook does not support 2 separate 2.5" storage drives.
It supports the use of either a SATA3 2.5" HDD or a SATA3 2.5" SSD.
That is why your BIOS image shows only one storage drive.

I have never used UEFI mode, so someone else here will need to help you make the switch.
Be aware that if Windows 10 was installed in Legacy mode, and then you switch to UEFI mode, your notebook will not boot.
You will need to reinstall Windows 10 in UEFI mode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dell Inspiron 15 5567 Notebook PC (support site)

You say you added a Crucial 1 TB SSD to the Toshiba 1 TB HDD that is already inside your notebook?
Your notebook does not support 2 separate 2.5" storage drives.
It supports the use of either a SATA3 2.5" HDD or a SATA3 2.5" SSD.
That is why your BIOS image shows only one storage drive.

I have never used UEFI mode, so someone else here will need to help you make the switch.
Be aware that if Windows 10 was installed in Legacy mode, and then you switch to UEFI mode, your notebook will not boot.
You will need to reinstall Windows 10 in UEFI mode.
don't give me heartattack please!~
I can access all hard disks and ssd from "this pc" and have even transferred files to and fro them.
It's possible to do this, I've checked with Dell official and Crucial as well.
 

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The laptop model you specified only has one 2.5" drive bay.
Did you use some sort of adapter for the optical drive and put the SSD in that bay?
Or did you just plug the SSD into the optical drive bay without an adapter?

Or do we have the wrong model number for the laptop?
Please post the service tag for your laptop.

Assuming model is correct, the SATA connector in the optical drive bay is 1.5 Gbps (SATA I) while the one in the 2.5" bay is 6 Gbps (SATA III). You should move the HDD to the optical bay and put the SSD in the HDD bay, otherwise the speed of the SSD will be greatly reduced. The HDD should not be impacted as it's max transfer speed is less than 1.5 Gbps anyway. But if you are not using a proper adapter, the drive in the optical bay is connected by only the SATA data+power connector, and it could slip out of that.

As for converting to UEFI, do you care about losing data or not?

Your current windows installation is on the HDD. If you want to keep any of that (programs + data), you should be cloning the HDD to the SSD. If you do this, you will need to convert not reinstall. Otherwise, you could install new to the SSD and move the data (Documents, Pictures, etc) / reinstall the programs to the SSD afterwards. Up to you.

When booted in UEFI mode, windows should install in that mode. Although this may depend on how you created the Windows Install USB. Create it on a computer that is booted in UEFI mode (or use Rufus and specify UEFI mode for the USB).

You may also need to convert the SSD to GPT (in the case that the Windows Installer won't do that for you) as the SSD has already been initialized as MBR during your previous installations. If the installer does not see the SSD as a place to install windows, you will need to convert it to GPT, like so:

open a command prompt window: press shift + F10 when booted to Windows Install USB (or possibly Fn+Shift+F10)
Type the commands in bold:
diskpart
list disk


look for ssd in this list, note it's number, see also if there is an * in the GPT column (if so, it is already initialized as gpt)

select disk #

where # is the number of the ssd (0, 1, 2, etc)

list disk

Ensure there is an * in the leftmost column for the SSD. That means you selected it correctly.

Next step erases all data on the selected disk, ensure the proper disk is selected and you don't care about the data on it before continuing:

clean
convert gpt
list disk


Should be an * in the GPT column for the SSD now.
Close the command prompt window and continue installation, refreshing the list of drives to install windows to, ssd should be there now.

There are ways to convert an existing Windows installation (from MBR/Legacy to GPT/UEFI) without losing data, but it's more complicated than reinstalling Windows.

After converting a Windows installation from MBR to GPT and then changing BIOS mode from Legacy to UEFI in the BIOS, you will need to boot windows in safe mode once before it will boot normally in UEFI mode.

I can provide more details if you prefer to go this route. If you clone, you will have to go this route.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
service tag=8BNWK22
put SSD in hard drive position, hdd in caddy in dvd drive position.
I don't care losing data in SSD, but care about hard disk.
My current windows is installed on SSD.

The laptop model you specified only has one 2.5" drive bay.
Did you use some sort of adapter for the optical drive and put the SSD in that bay?
Or did you just plug the SSD into the optical drive bay without an adapter?

Or do we have the wrong model number for the laptop?
Please post the service tag for your laptop.

Assuming model is correct, the SATA connector in the optical drive bay is 1.5 Gbps (SATA I) while the one in the 2.5" bay is 6 Gbps (SATA III). You should move the HDD to the optical bay and put the SSD in the HDD bay, otherwise the speed of the SSD will be greatly reduced. The HDD should not be impacted as it's max transfer speed is less than 1.5 Gbps anyway. But if you are not using a proper adapter, the drive in the optical bay is connected by only the SATA data+power connector, and it could slip out of that.

As for converting to UEFI, do you care about losing data or not?

Your current windows installation is on the HDD. If you want to keep any of that (programs + data), you should be cloning the HDD to the SSD. If you do this, you will need to convert not reinstall. Otherwise, you could install new to the SSD and move the data (Documents, Pictures, etc) / reinstall the programs to the SSD afterwards. Up to you.

When booted in UEFI mode, windows should install in that mode. Although this may depend on how you created the Windows Install USB. Create it on a computer that is booted in UEFI mode (or use Rufus and specify UEFI mode for the USB).

You may also need to convert the SSD to GPT (in the case that the Windows Installer won't do that for you) as the SSD has already been initialized as MBR during your previous installations. If the installer does not see the SSD as a place to install windows, you will need to convert it to GPT, like so:

open a command prompt window: press shift + F10 when booted to Windows Install USB (or possibly Fn+Shift+F10)
Type the commands in bold:
diskpart
list disk


look for ssd in this list, note it's number, see also if there is an * in the GPT column (if so, it is already initialized as gpt)

select disk #

where # is the number of the ssd (0, 1, 2, etc)

list disk

Ensure there is an * in the leftmost column for the SSD. That means you selected it correctly.

Next step erases all data on the selected disk, ensure the proper disk is selected and you don't care about the data on it before continuing:

clean
convert gpt
list disk


Should be an * in the GPT column for the SSD now.
Close the command prompt window and continue installation, refreshing the list of drives to install windows to, ssd should be there now.

There are ways to convert an existing Windows installation (from MBR/Legacy to GPT/UEFI) without losing data, but it's more complicated than reinstalling Windows.

After converting a Windows installation from MBR to GPT and then changing BIOS mode from Legacy to UEFI in the BIOS, you will need to boot windows in safe mode once before it will boot normally in UEFI mode.

I can provide more details if you prefer to go this route. If you clone, you will have to go this route.
 

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Is there a windows installation on the hard disk that you care about preserving?

Or are you okay with reinstalling programs and moving data from the HDD to a new windows installation on the SSD?

If the latter, then reinstall windows to the SSD.

First remove the HDD from the laptop (unscrew two screws on the back, and slide the caddy out). With that, it cannot be impacted here.

Go into BIOS and set boot mode to UEFI not Legacy. Can turn on secure boot, too.
Dell does not document this BIOS, so if you need help doing this, post screenshots of the BIOS.

Put the windows install USB into the laptop, save changes and reboot. While it is booting press the boot menu key (F12 or Fn+F12?). May need to repeatably press this to time it correctly.
Boot to the windows install USB in UEFI mode (you will need to remake the USB if UEFI is not an option for the USB in the boot menu).
Select language, keyboard layout etc. then click Install Now.
It should pickup the product key, version (home, pro) from what is embedded in the BIOS and skip asking you for these.
Select Custom install when it asks.
Do you then see a list of partitions where you can install windows or does the installer balk that no drive is available?

If it says no drive, refer to my previous post on converting the SSD to GPT with diskpart, then continue here.

If you do see a list and the HDD was removed then these are the partition on your current windows install on the SSD.
You want to delete all of the partitions until you have one unallocated partition (Note that this step destroys all data on the SSD).
Select the unallocated partition and click Next
Windows should install in UEFI mode.
 
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