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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Toshiba MK3021GAS 30Gb hard disk as an external drive. I've formatted it and run chkdsk /r on it three times. The report shows there are 16KB in bad sectors.
I'm just using this drive as storage, but I would like it to be safe. I guess the safest way would be to partition off the bad sectors.
I would appreciate members' suggestions on the best way to do this; that is isolate and set the bad sectors apart.
If anyone has any tips on fixing these sectors, that would be welcome too.

Thanks in advance.
Stephen.
 

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Good Evening Stephen_A, as you would be aware, when a drive begins to develop bad spots it is ongoing and progressively becomes significantly worse.
These bad spots are identified and locked out so that data is not placed in them. This bad spot information table is in the first section of the drive.

When scandisk or checkdisk is run, it progressivley adds information as it determines increased bad blocks.
This process is not reversible with any of these tools, the table only increases.

Windows needs to know it's start and finish area and if any problem happens to prevent that, will cause it problems.
If you have a partitioned drive and the partitioning points are affected it is likely that all information on that drive wil be lost, so the idea of partitioning bad areas out is not a good idea at all.
So you will appreciate regular running of scandisk etc. is preferable in this kind of circumstance, and as it progressivley finds more bads it tables them but still can allow data to be safely contained. (some may be occasionally lost)

Most often these problems are caused by the magnetic surface of the drive platters losing retentivity or magnetic properties.
A program has been developed (several in fact) that scan the drive surface and apply different pulsing type signals that do have the ability to actually recover most of these bad spots.
You can give it a trial and observe the effect. It is called HDDRegenerator.
http://www.dposoft.net/

It may be better to consider a new drive, anyway see what you find.

Cheers, qldit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the rapid and helpful reply. I know tha treplacing the disk is always a good option but I was just trying to squeeze a little more life out of something. I'll see how that software goes.
 

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Good On you, by the way don't tell anyone, but you can run it more than once.
The trial program fixes one bad spot on each run.
Cheers qldit.
 

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FWIW, I believe you're on a fool's errand trying to "fix" bad sectors. The disk could die at any time, most likely at the most awkward time possible. Bite the bullet and get a new disk, it's the only real fix.
 

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In eleven years at this annd going through hundreds of bad disks, I can recall only two disks with many bad sectors that I used successfully for many months. One was a disk that seemed to have scores of bad sectors right about in the center of its drive space. I created two primary partitions, one before and one after the bad area.

The other was from a computer that was positioned where it got kicked and bumped a lot. It had thousands of bad sectors and I used it successfully for over a year before I gave it to a penny-pinching customer. with appropriate caveat, of course. Last I heard, he was still using it.

In neither case did I trust anything important to these disks and I advise you do the same. I did these little experiments just for fun and as a learning experience.

I will say that with these two exceptions, all other disks with lots of bad sectors continued to fail with the failures getting worse all the time and sometimes the disks would become unreadable altogether. I have one on my workbench like that at this very moment. I did a restore for the customer about three months back and she didn't want to buy a new disk. I'm doing another restore right now, this time on a new disk.

With data recivery and all, she could have saved $240 and a lot of down time if she had let me replace the disk the first time.
 
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