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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've got the manual - refers to the CD and install wizard. I've read some reviews that suggest the setup is simple - also a note about needing to set up using the PC used to connect to your provider?
 

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I noticed that Netgear mentioned on their site to contact the supplier if the contents of the package are not complete. Perhaps you need to contact Tiger Direct for the cd.
Vicks
 

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Who is your ISP, what type of connection do you have, and what is the make and model of your modem.

Ease of setup depends upon your type of connection and the modem you are using.
Most standard DSL connections the modem does the actual authentication with the ISP and just passes the signal to what ever is connected to it.
Usually, in this case, you plug the router into the modem and turn it on.
Router recognizes the modem as a gateway and gets an IP in the modems subnet fron it.
You then plug the computer into the router and turn it on. If the computer's networking is set up for Auto IP and DNS, it will get an IP in the router's subnet.
At this point you have Internet.
You should then be able to access th User Interface on the router by entering the routers address in your browser and set up your wireless.
The router has a wizard to help you set it up, or you can do it manually.
Biggest problemin in this situation is if the modem and router use the same subnet and one of them would need to be changed.

Worst scenario, the modem is only an access point and your computer is doing the authentication. Which means all the information for connecting to your ISP needs to be entered into the router before youget internet.

If the manual you have is the same one shown onthe Netgear site, page 6 lists the information you may need for setting up the connection.
Manual setup starts on page 7.

The reason they say to use the same computer if you have cable.
Most cable systems also use MAC (Media Access Control) ID/address authentication. Every piece of equipment that is able to access the network has one.
In most cases the cable modem is only an access poit and the IP issued to that access is assigned the MAC address of the first device hooked to it.
It will not work with any other device unless MAC ID is reset at the cable distribution center.
To get around this, newer routers can clone (copy) the computer's MAC, if connected to it and use that information to athenticate the connection with the cable center.
 
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