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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A thread to post the accomplishments of women in our society.:)

Women's Art Women's Vision 2008 Theme

To honor the originality, beauty, imagination, and multiple dimensions of women’s lives, we have chosen Women’s Art: Women’s Vision as the 2008 theme for National Women’s History Month.

The history of women and art is quintessential women’s history. It is the story of amazing women’s accomplishments acclaimed at the time but written out of history. Join us in ensuring that their accomplishments are never forgotten.

http://www.nwhp.org/whm/index.php
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Roosevelt Names Last of Cabinet 1931, first woman named to Cabinet :up:
By James A. Hagerty
Special Dispatch to the New York Times

Hyde Park, Feb. 28 - The completion of his Cabinet was announced today by President-elect Roosevelt when he named Senator Thomas J. Walsh of Montana as Attorney General, Daniel C. Roper of Washington as Secretary of Commerce and Frances Perkins, head of the State Labor Department, as Secretary of Labor.

Excerpt from: http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0304.html#article
 

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Thanks Pooches....pretty cool:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ida Eisenhower
Mother of Dwight D. Eisenhower

By Anne Adams

As General Dwight D. Eisenhower planned and then
directed the Allied assault on D Day, June 6, 1944 , it
was the high point in a long military career that
would later lead to the presidency. Yet what was
interesting and even ironic was that his family's
religious heritage did not support his profession, for
his parents and in particular his mother were devoted
pacifists.

Excerpt from: http://www.historyswomen.com/amazingmoms/Ida.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nelly Bly World Traveling
Investigative Reporter

By Anne Adams

In the late Victorian era when most young women were content to remain close to home there were a few who extended their horizons to explore their world and even write about what they discovered. Today we often call these persons investigative reporters and most every newspaper or TV news department has them. Yet in the 1880s women reporters were almost non-existent. Except for Nelly Bly, who was not only unique in being a reporter but also in how she did it.

The reporter the world came to know as Nelly Bly was born Elizabeth Cochrane in a Pennsylvania mill town in 1867 but she left there as a teenager for Pittsburgh to pursue a writing career. She got her start in 1885 when she attracted editorial attention at the Pittsburgh Dispatch upon her submission of a contrasting opinion to an editorial. The editors were impressed with her spirit and they offered her a job as a reporter.

As her first assignment Elizabeth suggested a series of pieces on divorce, and while the editors doubted that someone so young could handle such a delicate and controversial subject they agreed. However, she did it well, using personal stories from the women in her boarding house, and there were two important results. First, the series sold papers and second, it was her first use of the pseudonym Nelly Bly, which came from a popular Stephen Collins Foster song.

Nelly followed with an expose of the terrible conditions in Pittsburgh 's slums, prisons, and work places. However, some locals did not welcome such attention so the newspaper suggested she leave town for a while. She headed for Mexico where she continued to submit similar exposes of the official corruption and poor living conditions south of the border. Mexican officials weren't pleased and soon she was returned to the U.S. but she did manage to smuggle her notes out in her luggage explaining to inspectors that the suitcase contained "unmentionables." :D

Nelly headed for New York and there she proposed an article series to Joseph Pulitzer of the World, the city's most widely read paper. She intended to reveal the terrible conditions in the city's mental institutions and for that she had to go undercover. After practicing what she felt were the right shrieks and grimaces before a mirror, she checked into a boardinghouse with no identification. There she staged a violent scene in the dining room and was whisked off to a mental "asylum." Ten days later she emerged with tragic stories of cruel nursing personnel, poor food service, and filthy conditions. The resultant articles brought the necessary reforms and Nelly was now a celebrity.

Excerpt from: http://www.historyswomen.com/socialreformer/NellyBly.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Harriet G. Hosmer
American Sculptor

1830 - 1908

Harriet Hosmer was a great woman sculptor who brought respect to both her native land and her sex by her brilliant work. Her life and work was proof that Americans could be sculptors and that a woman could handle a chisel as well as a paint brush.

Harriet Hosmer was born in Watertown, Massachusetts into a physician’s family. Due to the death of her mother and older sister from tuberculosis, her father, an eminent physician, encouraged her to spend much time outdoors in the open air. Harriet soon became an excellent athlete. She loved nature and became quite adept at hunting, fishing, rowing, and horseback riding. Spending this time outdoors helped her to gain a thorough knowledge of animal life, and when while she was but a child she began to model dogs, horses, and other animals in a clay pit near her home.

Formal education was of secondary importance to Harriet. She attended school at Lenox, Massachusetts and her school days were not marked by scholarship or attention to the routine of school life. Nature was her school and teacher. She often despaired of those who were appointed to be her instructors. Finding sculpting her forte, Harriet went to St. Louis to study anatomy, since she could not gain admission to the conservative medical schools of the East. Human Anatomy, which was a necessary course of study for sculptors, was usually forbidden to women.

http://www.historyswomen.com/thearts/HarrietGHosmer.html
 

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We have black history month, we celebrate cinco de mayo, we have womens history month and we have Memorial day.

We celebrate with other religions at their time of worship. We are a good people. :up:

Now, can we have "white dudes" month? You know, just for "white dudes"?? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We have black history month, we celebrate cinco de mayo, we have womens history month and we have Memorial day.

We celebrate with other religions at their time of worship. We are a good people. :up:

Now, can we have "white dudes" month? You know, just for "white dudes"?? :D
Stop whinning.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Maria Tallchief
Prima Ballerina 1925


Maria Tallchief has been recognized as the most accomplished ballerina to come out of the United States. She has studied with such notable dance teachers and choreographers as Bronislava Nijinska and George Balanchine. Her uniqueness and her outstanding ability blended together to create one of the most vital chapters in the history of American Dance (http://kennedycenter.org/honors/history/honoree/maria.html).

Maria Tallchief was born on January 24, 1925 on an Indian reservation in Fairfax, Oklahoma. While her father was a member of the Osage tribe, her mother was of Irish and Scottish descent. When Maria was quite young, her family moved to Los Angeles where Maria began music and dance lessons. Her first dance teacher was dance pioneer Bronislava Nijinska and after she studied with him for five years Maria joined the Ballet Russe de Montte Carlo. Because of her talent, she soon became a soloist in this ballet company and performed in a variety of ballets such as Scheherezade , Gaite Parisieene, and George Balanchine's Serenade. While dancing in Song of Norway Maria met choreographer George Balanchine and the two were married in 1946. Maria became his inspiration for several of his ballets and together they turned his Ballet Society into the New York City Ballet.

Excerpt from: http://www.historyswomen.com/historyinthemaking/MariaTallchief.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
MONICA
A.D. 332-387
Mother of St. Augustine


Monica was a remarkable woman that is numbered among the mothers of great men. Her son was Augustine, who became the foremost of the Latin Church Fathers and one of the most influential Christians of all times. The church and the world owe a great debt to Monica for giving us her brilliant, holy, and mighty son.

Monica was born in 332 A.D. to Christian parents who were moderately wealthy. Her home was at Tagasta in North Africa and she was cared for by an old Christian maid servant, who had also cared for Monica’s father as a baby, and it is by this sweet woman that Monica is said to have been brought up in the Christian faith.

Monica was given in marriage to Patricus, an unbeliever, who was later found to have a violent temper and given to an adulterous, immoral life. While she must have suffered greatly in this relationship, Monica is never known to have been impatient or reproachful of her husband. Following the advice in 1 Peter 3, Monica sought to win Patricus to the Lord by her conduct rather than her words. By her loving behavior and perseverance, Monica won her mother-in-law to Jesus Christ, and Patricus, too, became a Christian near the end of his life.

Being a peacemaker at heart, Monica was well known for healing rifts between people. She was also well esteemed by her acquaintances for a sterling character which included forsaking bitterness and gossip and ministering to those who were teachers or pastors of churches. But she had one great burden on her heart; the salvation of her family.

The rest at: http://www.historyswomen.com/amazingmoms/Monica.html
 

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A thread to post the accomplishments of our society.

To honor the originality, beauty, imagination, and multiple dimensions of life
Stop whinning.:D
Stop whining? What race and sex has created the most beauty in this world? What race and sex has had enough imagination to get us into space, beneath the sea, on top of mountains, and write fantastic works of fiction that make the mind wander as well as wonder.

What race and sex has done the most to bring the joys and beauty of all the differences in this world together to inspire all others?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Stop whining? What race and sex has created the most beauty in this world? What race and sex has had enough imagination to get us into space, beneath the sea, on top of mountains, and write fantastic works of fiction that make the mind wander as well as wonder.

What race and sex has done the most to bring the joys and beauty of all the differences in this world together to inspire all others?
Start a thread on it.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Irena Sendler
Friend of the Jews

“I could have done more. This regret will follow me to my death.”
--Irena Sendler

During World War II, Hitler’s Nazi regime built the Warsaw Ghetto, a 16 block area in the city of Warsaw , Poland , and proceeded to herd over 500,000 Polish Jews behind its wall to await annihilation. While many non-Jewish Poles turned their backs, such was not the case with Irena Sendler. Though her name is not recognized by most, Irena Sendler in an unsung heroine who defied the Nazis and saved 2,500 Jewish children from certain death by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto.

Born in 1910 as Irena Krzyzanowski, she grew up in Otwock, a town about 15 miles southeast of Warsaw . Irena was greatly influenced by her father, Stanislaw, who was one of the first Polish Socialists. His ideas were a great influence on her as she studied Polish literature and was part of the leftist Union of Democratic Youth. Irena’s heart for the Jewish people of her nation may have been acquired by watching her father, a medical doctor, take care his patients, many of which were of poor Jews.

As an adult, Irena worked as senior administrator in the Warsaw Social Welfare Department that ran the canteens of the city when Germany invaded the country in 1939. Under her direction, these canteens not only provided food, financial aid, and other services for orphans, elderly, and poor but also clothing, medicine, and money for Jewish families. To avoid inspections, the Jews were registered under fictitious names and were reported as patients suffering from highly contagious diseases.

When the Warsaw Ghetto was built in 1940 to contain the nation’s Jewish population, Irena was appalled. She was so horrified by the conditions of the Ghetto that she joined the Council for Aid to Jews, Zegota , organized by the Polish underground resistance movement, and directed the efforts to rescue Jewish children. At that time nearly 5,000 people were dying a month from starvation and diseases.

In order to gain access to the Warsaw Ghetto, Irena used her position in the Welfare Department to obtain a pass from the Warsaw Epidemic Control Department. She visited it daily with the aim of re-establishing contacts, bringing food, medicines, and clothes. While there, she wore a star armband as a sign of her solidarity to Jews.

One of her most difficult tasks in rescuing the children was getting the Jewish parents to agree to let her smuggle their little ones out of the Ghetto. While she could not give them the guarantee that their children would survive the escape, she could guarantee that they would certainly die if they stayed. The cries of both parents and children being separated continued to haunt Irena her entire life.

In order to succeed in her efforts, Irena needed help from the outside. She recruited at least one person from each of the ten centers of the Social Welfare Department. With their help, Irena issued hundreds of false documents with forged signatures and successfully smuggled approximately 2,500 Jewish children to safety and gave them new identities.

http://www.historyswomen.com/womenoffaith/IrenaSendler.html
 

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Start a thread on it.:)
No, I'll just make it aware here that while a minority of white males have done more than their share in trying to control all that they can, the majority freely accept, encourage, and enjoy the arts from other viewpoints.
 

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A dear friend sent this to me I'd like to share it..:up:

This is the story of our Grandmothers, and Great-grandmothers, as they lived only 90 years ago. It was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go to the polls and vote.




The women were innocent and defenseless. And by the end of the night, they were barely alive. Forty (40) prison guards wielding clubs and with their warden's blessing went on a rampage against the 33 women wrongly convicted of 'obstructing sidewalk traffic.'

They beat Lucy Burn, chained her hands to the cell bars above her head and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping for air.

They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cellmate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead and suffered a heart attack.

Additional affidavits describe the guards grabbing, dragging, beating, choking, slamming, pinching, twisting and kicking the women.




Thus unfolded the 'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917,



When the warden at the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia ordered his guards to teach a lesson to the suffragists imprisoned there because they dared to picket Woodrow Wilson's White House for the right to vote.




For weeks, the women's only water came from an open pail. Their food--all of it colorless slop--was infested with worms. When one of the leaders, Alice Paul, embarked on a hunger strike, they tied her to a chair, forced a tube down her throat and poured liquid into her until she vomited. She was tortured like this for weeks until word was smuggled out to the press.




So, refresh my memory. Some women won't vote this year because--why, exactly? We have carpool duties? We have to get to work? Our vote doesn't matter? It's raining?



Last week, I went to a sparsely attended screening of HBO's new movie 'Iron Jawed Angels.' It is a graphic depiction of the battle these women waged so that I could pull the curtain at the polling booth and have my say. I am ashamed to say I needed the reminder.




All these years later, voter registration is still my passion. But the actual act of voting had become less personal for me, more rote. Frankly, voting often felt more like an obligation than a privilege. Sometimes it was inconvenient.




My friend Wendy, who is my age and studied women's history, saw the HBO movie, too. When she stopped by my desk to talk about it, she looked angry. She was--with herself. 'One thought kept coming back to me as I watched that movie,' she said. 'What would those women think of the way I use--or don't use--my right to vote?

All of us take it for granted now, not just younger women, but those of us who did seek to learn.' The right to vote, she said, had become valuable to her 'all over again.'




HBO released the movie on video and DVD. I wish all history, s ocial studies and government teachers would include the movie in their curriculum. I want it shown on Bunco night, too, and anywhere else women gather. I realize this isn't our usual idea of socializing, but we are not voting in the numbers that we should be, and I think a little shock therapy is in order.




It is jarring to watch Woodrow Wilson and his cronies try to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so that she could be permanently institutionalized. And it is inspiring to watch the doctor refuse.

Alice Paul was strong, he said, and brave. That didn't make her crazy.




The doctor admonished the men: 'Courage in women is often mistaken for insanity.'




Please, if you are so inclined, pass this on to all the women you know.

We need to get out and vote and use this right that was fought so hard for by these very courageous women. Whether you vote democratic, republican or independent party - remember to vote.




History is being made.
 
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