Tech Support Guy banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

In my quest to figure out vlans today... This book im reading refers to switch ports as having more that one device attached to them in some situations.

Im wondering what are some of the more common port configurations for
a "single port" on a multi-port switch. Im not referring to the root ports or ports that are used to connect to other layer 2 or 3 devices for redundancy. But for some reason.. I always think of one node as connected to a port switch and thats it, (a printer perhaps, one pc, or a server etc) creating just one segment. I just figured that on big switches, there would be enough ports for dedicating one device per port.

So what Im looking for... is when people talk about having more that one device per port (on a switch)... do you know what there referring to exactly? Or are they just really saying that in some cases a single port can support "multiple devices" by actually connecting to another hub, bridge, or switch and its devices (and the mac addresses which would be added to that specific port ( routing table)? Im just trying to make sure im not overlooking anything

Any tips would be great. thanks much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
896 Posts
Trunk ports. What you're referring to is fairly correct in that you would typically see that with hubs/other switches/etc.

A VLAN tagged [trunk] port can carry multiple VLANs of traffic at Layer2. So you can have logical separation over one physical port.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
779 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
cool thanks... I can see then, how just using one high end switch, could provide nearly limitless possibilites as far as quality of service goes, and make it easy to control collision domains as well. :up:
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top