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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think of a digital picture as being so-may pixels high and so-many pixels wide. Scan lines is something I associate with analog devices.

Now I'm seeing digital camcorders that are designated NTSC. I fully understand NTSC uses scan lines and, to me, this analog protocol is foreign to my understanding of a digital camera.

I thought that with the advent of digital television, scan lines were supposed to become relegated to antiquity. Why not the same with digital camcorders?

How do I reconcile these seemingly incompatible formats?
 

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The ntsc is used for direct viewing on a tv or other device
with composite inputs from the cameras output.
You should be able to transfer the video file to a computer
for editing and burning with the proper software via USB.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The ntsc is used for direct viewing on a tv or other device
Can I correctly assume then that the video is recorded purely as "so-many" pixel images per second and that the NTSC protocol is not at all used in creating the video?

If this is true, if I never used the camera, itself, as a playback device on an analog display, it would not matter whether I have an NTSC camera or a PAL camera. Is that so?
 

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That should be the case.
The video file itself should be digital.
Check the specs on the camera to see what format it records in.
It should say something like mpeg2 or mpeg4 or something similar.
Some may use a proprietary file format like .mov or quick time,but
these can usually be converted.
 
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