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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I heard that Mass Effect is a good Action RPG and want to buy it. But I am just a bit reluctant since I don't know for sure what is its current DRM status*. Since there will be likely more games with similar kind of DRM, is it reasonable to ask that the games makers to state clearly on the label which DRM they use, thus saving gamers from getting confused?

* online information is always behind time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My opinion on the DRM subject is simple: GAMERS MUST BE ABLE TO RUN UNLIMITED TIMES ON ONE COMPUTER*. If games makers do otherwise then it is their faults or their greedy selves. And I for one will not buy any game that restricts the number of play by activation times.

what kind of rpg you have?
I have most of the available good rpgs. Hehe. But my games are not restricted to rpg.

* not windows edition, any upgrade or change of monitor.
 

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Quite honestly, (and I'm not supporting the act here, just making a rhetorical point) the more severe DRM gets, the more it encourages piracy. This sounds counter-intuitive, but the reality is any game worth playing will eventually be "cracked." If it gets so bad that it's easier to pirate the game than buy it, then that is what people will do. It's sad, but developers aren't entirely catching on yet. I've heard stories of people having to download "cracks" for games they legally purchased because of faulty DRM. Or not-faulty DRM that prevented them from re-installing the game.

Are you looking at buying Mass Effect by buying a physical disk or via Steam?

The disk has online authentication. If you buy the disk, you can install it on up to five computers, and the sixth computer will need EA customer service in order to work with it. Speaking from personal experience here: Don't count on EA customer service. They couldn't care less about you. But unless you have a lot of different computers for gaming, this isn't really an issue.

The Steam version has the same DRM as all Steam downloads - a game is tied to your account and you can install it on any co,puter, but you'll need your Steam account to do so.

Either way, you'll need online activation. This is a generally painless process and nothing should go wrong here, but it's noteworthy if the computer you intend to play it on has no internet.

The DRM is worth it - Mass Effect is a phenomenal game and Bioware is one of very, very few developers that actually listen to their customers, which is why their initially-planned DRM routine (periodic reactivation) was cancelled in favor of the current plan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you looking at buying Mass Effect by buying a physical disk or via Steam?
I stick to hard copy as a rule.I had bad experience buying download copy from Trem ... . The fact is I am kind of feel not secure when giving away my credit id to online folks and I want to limit it as much as possible. Maybe it is just old habit dies hard.*

The disk has online authentication. If you buy the disk, you can install it on up to five computers, and the sixth computer will need EA customer service in order to work with it.
So they even dropped the activation times limit? Last time I heard they allowed 3 activation times.

The disk has online authentication.
I have no problem with online authentication except if it requires internet during playing.

* truely, it's not the habit. I am thinking it would be difficult for me to find their address from their website.
 

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No, they have an activation limit of five, beyond which you'll have to deal with EA customer support.

BUT, they also had a planned periodic re-activation thing planned, too, wher ethe game would "check in" every ten days. A lot of users complained about fears that if that server went down for any reason, they'd lose the game they legally purchased, etc. This feature was removed at BioWare's request.

You only need the Internet the first time you play, for activation and updates and such.
 

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Sorry if I missed something here people but there's an EA deauthorization tool that works for Mass Effect along with other EA titles...

This doesn't completely eliminate the DRM pain but at least it gives you the ability to install the game on virtually ANY machine. You just can't have the game installed on more than five machines simultaneously.

I agree, it's still a pain but at least it's fair. You can find the EA De-Authorization Tools from their official authorization management site:

http://activate.ea.com/deauthorize/gamesList.html

So, by using this application you skip the part of dealing with EA's costumer support! You can find additional info on how the system works on their site.

BTW, ME it's a great game, you won't regret getting it. Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Securom started with music CDs but people do not have strong objection to it since it doesn't send info back to any company. It is not the same with securom/DRM in computers. The concern here is does it send back info about gamers habits, credits ... We don't know, YET. One thing for sure, traders love to have that kind of info ( think about the existence of such software as "doubleclick" ... which people consider as a form of "malware" ).
 

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Securom started with music CDs but people do not have strong objection to it since it doesn't send info back to any company. It is not the same with securom/DRM in computers. The concern here is does it send back info about gamers habits, credits ... We don't know, YET.
Well I'm not that concerned about that. In fact I don't believe it's happening - at least not via copy protection applications. I just find most modern DRM systems annoying...And I of course hate copy protection applications that are suspected to cause harm to your computer (StarForce).

On the other hand companies need to protect their games. I know, the argument everyone uses is that every copy protection system is eventually cracked. But what's going to happen if games are released completely unprotected?

One thing for sure, traders love to have that kind of info ( think about the existence of such software as "doubleclick" ... which people consider as a form of "malware" .
Sure they do!

But think of it, why should companies bother spying on us via mechanisms like -let's say- SecuROM, when they can just use applications like Games For Windows or even Steam to monitor our gaming and usage habits? As an example think of those newly introduced "achievements" systems modern games employ. Our games are being monitored! And most of us do not even realize that.
 

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But what's going to happen if games are released completely unprotected?
Ask Stardock; they don't put copy protection on any of their games. At all. Not even a CD key. In fact, I think my copy of Sins of a Solar Empire doesn't even need the disk to play it, just to install.

I think a minimal protection is necessary and deters "casual" piracy by people that may just buy the game if they like it and can't get it for free. But the type of people that go out of their way to defeat overly draconian copy protection probably aren't going to buy the game anyway, so can you really count them in economic consideration?

The biggest fallacy in the theory behind copy protection is assuming all these pirates would have bought the game otherwise. Most don't.

Yet, most pirates I've talked to on the subject own a lot of video games, too, and why would they own games if they could theoretically get them all for free? There are natural reasons why most people buy video games. I guarantee you they aren't copy protection.

My only other thought is that the frustrating and often uncomfortably invasive copy-protection encourages people to crack it anyway. I know people who've had to pirate games they've legally bought because the copy-protection glitched.

As for tracking what games I play - hell, I could just tell them that. They're not asking for my phone number, address, and a photo of me, they just want to know what I'm playing. This seems like a reasonable question coming from game developers. They want to know what people are playing so they know more accurately what is and isn't desired by gamers. This could mean in turn games more suitable for audience's tastes. If that's all they wished to track, I wouldn't really mind it.
 

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Ask Stardock; they don't put copy protection on any of their games. At all. Not even a CD key. In fact, I think my copy of Sins of a Solar Empire doesn't even need the disk to play it, just to install.
Good point. However there are a lot of people who believe the contrary. Take Windows Vista for example. Yes, Vista had problems. Yes, Vista is a performance hog. But if it was easy for everyone to pirate it, then it would hold the greatest market share. Windows XP on the other hand can be easily pirated and used on several machines at the same time. You can even get updates for your illegal installation of XP.

Another common argument is the PlayStation vs Saturn hypothesis. Sony prevailed on the game console market because the original PS could be easily modded so it could run pirated games. Saturn users on the other hand had to pay for their games.

Of course both Vista and the Sega Saturn are considered failures by many. But you get my point, people will pirate something as long as it can get pirated. They will choose whatever can be easily pirated over the competition.

I think a minimal protection is necessary and deters "casual" piracy by people that may just buy the game if they like it and can't get it for free. But the type of people that go out of their way to defeat overly draconian copy protection probably aren't going to buy the game anyway, so can you really count them in economic consideration?
But what companies are trying to fight is this "casual" piracy! Well, it's a bit complicated, what's your definition of "casual" piracy?

Nowdays almost everyone has access to broadband internet and torrent sites provide full games, sometimes already cracked. Even a moron can follow the directions provided by the pirates and play the game for free. Isn't that casual piracy?

The biggest fallacy in the theory behind copy protection is assuming all these pirates would have bought the game otherwise. Most don't.
According to my personal experience most don't...I agree...

Yet, most pirates I've talked to on the subject own a lot of video games, too, and why would they own games if they could theoretically get them all for free? There are natural reasons why most people buy video games. I guarantee you they aren't copy protection.
Agreed again. I have a big collection of music CDs...I could have downloaded them for free, in descent quality mp3s. I didn't, not because of DRM but because I like them.

My only other thought is that the frustrating and often uncomfortably invasive copy-protection encourages people to crack it anyway. I know people who've had to pirate games they've legally bought because the copy-protection glitched.
That's not exactly piracy...That's cracking...They used modified code to eliminate the protection but they still had paid for their game...It's not legal but at least it's ethical IMHO.

Now if they just downloaded the game out of fear of a copy protection glitch...Then shame on them...You see, those two cases are completely different.;)

As for tracking what games I play - hell, I could just tell them that. They're not asking for my phone number, address, and a photo of me, they just want to know what I'm playing. This seems like a reasonable question coming from game developers. They want to know what people are playing so they know more accurately what is and isn't desired by gamers. This could mean in turn games more suitable for audience's tastes. If that's all they wished to track, I wouldn't really mind it.
Well said. In fact this works in favour of gamers. My previous post was hypothetical. ;)

Anyway, I am not deffending DRM systems, I actually hate them! So we agree in most parts. I provide some arguments just for the sake of the conversation.:)
 

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Another common argument is the PlayStation vs Saturn hypothesis. Sony prevailed on the game console market because the original PS could be easily modded so it could run pirated games. Saturn users on the other hand had to pay for their games.
There are a lot of better reasons than piracy to explain why the Saturn failed. I really doubt the fact that Playstation modding was more popular had a really significant impact.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sega_Saturn#Performance_in_the_marketplace
 
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