Tech Support Guy banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I was to add 2 extra outlets in the garage would I need a permit.The garage is unfinished meaning theres no drywall so everythings exposed. The wood studs and rafters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Depends on local/regional electrical code.

You probably do need a permit. Having said that, VERY FEW people ever obtain permits for activity like that.

If in doubt, call the municipality where you live. They'll tell you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,286 Posts
lexmarks567 said:
If I was to add 2 extra outlets in the garage would I need a permit.The garage is unfinished meaning theres no drywall so everythings exposed. The wood studs and rafters.
the uniform building code technically requires a permit for something even as insignificant as this....but it's nearly an impossibility to enforce....i view its "requirement" as an easy way for a city to pick up a couple of bucks....

if it was my house, i wouldn't sweat it. :D

since the walls are exposed, if you're planning on doing it to code, in most locations you'll need to run flex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57,788 Posts
I say as long as you know how to do then do it without a permit. But really a permit is needed by most all local/regional building code. I worked in one town that was the worse I ever seen about doing things because you needed a permit to replace or put a fence, sidewalk or anything at all that most places you don't need a permit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Careful who you even tell (if you decide to do it yourself.)
Some communities require that the entire house be brought up to the present electric code if even so little as a relocated switch.
Same goes with plumbing. Moving a sink to another wall might require replacing the flushie with a 2 gallon wonder.
Go ahead and do it yourself, but use an instruction manual-example-use plates over the stud holes so future walboard screws or nails don't penetrate the cable or use conduit or flex.
Good luck
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
106,726 Posts
I do suggest you make sure the installation meets the local electrical code. I agree with the masses, I sure don't run out to get a permit every time I change a light bulb. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ok got 3 outlets and boxes (PVC boxes for new contrucion) the wall plates.I have got wire staples from a left over project.I will get wire next week.14/2 W/G NM cable either 50 or 100 feet I will mesure to see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,286 Posts
lexmarks567 said:
Ok got 3 outlets and boxes (PVC boxes for new contrucion) the wall plates.I have got wire staples from a left over project.I will get wire next week.14/2 W/G NM cable either 50 or 100 feet I will mesure to see.
if it matters to you, check the code first, lex....in CA, outlet circuits need to be run in #12...and, unless you're going to cover those walls, boxes should be metal, wire pulled in flex.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Im going by whats in the garage already. theres 2 outlets in the garage connected by 14/2 NM cable the wire runs inside the wall between the studes just like in a house.then it goes to a juncion box on the rafters.heres a painting of it I will take pictures later of whats there right now.

the black represents the wall and studes the blue line is the wire and the red boxes are the outlets and juncion box. I have a book called wire smpilfied based on the 2005 NEC the next version won't be out till 2008
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,372 Posts
Howdy

I believe the National Electric code calls for #12 in garages only... or 20 amp curcuits

If adding to an existing 15 amp curcuit there is no need for #12... it requires a 20 amp breaker... Can't have 20amp curcuit breaker on 15 amp wire..... 14 is the gauge to use... if the whole rest of the garage/room is exposed studs and wiring, no need to use metal boxes or flex... no need to update to current code for such a small job... If you know what you are doing ... just do it...

In the end, how would anyone know it was not done from the begining...

dislexis edit

buck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
lexmarks567 said:
If I was to add 2 extra outlets in the garage would I need a permit.The garage is unfinished meaning theres no drywall so everythings exposed. The wood studs and rafters.
Other people have addressed the permit issue saying technically
you must have it in most places.

Current (most USA) require new circuits for this use be 20A
requiring 12AWG wire. If you are adding onto old work, a 15A
circuit using 14AWG wire then it would be allowed to keep it
the same.

I would just make sure that only two outlets are on the circuit
so that you could safely add another two. With open construction
run the new wire in the middle of the studs or in ways it can't
get snagged. if you run between studs the the holes need to
be in the center of the studs. you need to prevent this wire
from being snagged or pushed, if a wall covering isn't put over
the wire where it is in the air between studs then you need
to nail a board between the studs that covers the wire,
alternately you could place a board behind the wire and
tack it down.

It wouldn't be a bad idea to make sure other exposed wiring
in garage is protected so. It is easy to snag open wires with
garden tools and ladders.

You sould put a ground fault interrupt recepticle as the first
outlet (this would mean replacing the one there now with
a GFI outlet) and wire the second outlet in the load terminals
of the GFI outlet (reuse the outlet that was there first if it
is in good shape).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,372 Posts
Just do it...

I have a builders license in my state and while I am not condoning it...what you are thinking of doing is done all the time accross the country... If every homeowner pulled a permit according to the strict letter of the law for projects such as the one you are going to do, the local inspectors would get nothing done...

If you are comfortable/confident with it...go for it and forget the permit...

ps... shut the breaker off before you start... ;)

Edit: Is there anything else on the curcuit before the light/junction in your picture other than a switch for the light, which is of no consequence
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,817 Posts
Hi the only consideration here in the UK is insurance.
All electical work here has to be done by a certified electrician [new rules this year] just in case the unthinkable happens.
Although as has been said it's not the most difficult of jobs and many go ahead and just do it.
My only question is how old is the existing wiring?
Adding new to old can overheat the existing wiring.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,372 Posts
Howdy blues_harp28

That would also be a consideration here if it could be proved...
The laws, atleast in my state, have just recently changed as well... Used to be that the homeowner could pull the permit and do the work as long as it was inspected... no more...licensed electrician must pull the permit and do the work...

plastic work boxes and 14/2 w/ground does not sound to old to me

are you saying you would get a permit?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,817 Posts
Hi buck52 no I wouldn't get a permit..but have worked over 30 years in building trade for my sins.
It's an easy job to do and as in many cases the more we think..ask ??s about something the more problems we seem to uncover.
I think all possible concerns have been covered.
lexmarks567 let us know how it all goes.
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top