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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Firstly, I know the refresh rate doesn't matter for LCDs, its the response times.

However, I have the otpion for my LCD to have it at 60Hz or 75Hz. Even if this has no effect on blurring etc, which one is best?

I am assuming 75hz? Is this correct?

It won't shorten the life of my LCD will it? (i'm thinking along the lines of OCing shortening CPU life etc...laugh at me if you must)
 

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yo grudger. set it at 60hz . 60hz is the switching rate of alternating current here in the u.s. some other countries may use the 75hz speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How would I find out what it is for Australia?
 

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My Princeton Graphics 19" LCD specifies 1280x1024 at 60hz for the best results. I suspect if you read your skimpy manual, they may make a similar recommendation. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
actually its 70Hz, not 75Hz, if that makes a difference.
 

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Generally, it's best to set the refresh rate to something other than the frequency of the local power supply. Seeting it the same can result in unusual strobing effects between the screen and any non-incandescent light sources and result in eye strain or headaches. Setting it to 70 won't reduce the life of the screen and will insure that it is different from surrounding lights.
 

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codecfears said:
Your going to want to set it higher than the Hz of the AC in your country unless you enjoy flicker. I know this to be true for CRT. I won't stake my name on LCD settings.
Bingo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cool. Thanks everyone.
 

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I thought the 60-75 hz was the refreh rate. that is how many times a second the monitor puts a new picture on the screen. For a comparison, a non-interlaced (progressive) TV will run at 60hz. Old interlaced TV 30. If the frequency is to low, you will see flicker in the image. you should set it at the lowest frequency that produces the best image. I have my LCD at 60hz. 75 or higher made no difference. The higher the frequeny the more you computer and/or video card must work to produce the image.

Steve L
 

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.....HZ for lcd is truly refresh rates. heres an interesting article....silly me...lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
???
 

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...oops....
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
righto
 

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Elvandil said:
Generally, it's best to set the refresh rate to something other than the frequency of the local power supply. Seeting it the same can result in unusual strobing effects between the screen and any non-incandescent light sources and result in eye strain or headaches. Setting it to 70 won't reduce the life of the screen and will insure that it is different from surrounding lights.
FWIW, I live in the US, and I have my PG LCD set at 60Hz, and it's rock solid. That was their recommendation, and it looked great, so I left it there. That recommendation is applicable to CRT screens, but both of my LCD screens run at 60Hz, and they're not affected. Since the pixels are active and only change when the data changes, I don't think the LCD is subject to the same flicker issue as a conventional CRT.
 

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FWIW, I live in the US, and I have my PG LCD set at 60Hz, and it's rock solid. That was their recommendation, and it looked great, so I left it there. That recommendation is applicable to CRT screens, but both of my LCD screens run at 60Hz, and they're not affected. Since the pixels are active and only change when the data changes, I don't think the LCD is subject to the same flicker issue as a conventional CRT.
That is certainly true. And the refreshing of individual LCD pixels is not so nearly instantaneous as that of CRT's, so I agree that it is much less of an issue with LCD's.
 
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