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I have a 2 partitioned 500 GB hard drive. Each partition has Windows Vista Ultimate in a dual-boot situation. According to Disk Management the HD is Basic 456.76 GB. My set-up shows that the first partition Local Disk (C:) is 241.15 GB. Healthy (Boot Page, File, Active Crash Dump, Primary Partition) and the second partition is (E:) is 224GB NTFS Healthy (Primary Partiton). I am hoping to update to Windows 7 on both (C:) and (E:)when it comes out in October to get rid of Vista. I have several basic questions:

1) Can I shrink (C:) drive? I want only enough space for the Win 7 update and a little bit more space. I don't need or have any use for a 241 GB root drive. I am almost positive I can but want confirmation. I assume it is done with the right click on the (C:) box while in Disk Management.
2) Will the shrinking cause any damage to the contents of the (C:) drive?
3) If I shrink the (C:) drive down to, say, 100 GB, what happens to the other 141 GB?
4) Can I then add the 141 GB to (E:) drive without causing any damage to the (E:) drive and is this also done in Disk Management?

I did the partitioning. I just have never shrunk any partitions. I hope this makes some sense and I apologize for such a long thread and you'll be gentle on an 66-year old geezer. Any assistance anyone can provide would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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1.--Yes but Vista may severely restrict you to how much space it can free up. It won't be able to move certain files that might be stuck out toward the end of the partition, causing that problem. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...ows-vistas-shrink-volume-inadequacy-problems/ describes the problem better and offers some workarounds to free up more space but it can still be a pain to get all the files moved to free up all the desired space. Try it and Vista will tell you right away just how much is available for shrinking.

2. No damage in 99+ percent of cases but the advice is always to have a backup regardless.

3. It becomes unallocated space on a primary partition and free space on a logical partition.

4. If the E partition is physically to the right of the C partition in disk management you cannot add the unallocated space to E since you cannot move the partition border of E to the left. What you would have to do to make that work is make the unallocated space between into a new partition, clone E to that new partition and then delete the E partition, change the drive letter of the new partition to E to maintain any cross partition associations if needed, and then extend the new partition to the right to absorb that unallocated space.
 
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