Tech Support Guy banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks, I'm hoping someone can help me with this.

I just got a netgear router, so I can use the internet on 2 machines and share files between them.

The internet part works just fine, but the sharing files part is driving me nuts.

Basically the problem is that there's just so many ways to get it wrong and only one to get it right- and I can't seem to find that one.

I don't know if the problem is that one computer is Windows 98 (SE) and the other is XP (home).

Or maybe I just set things up wrong.

But either way, no matter what I do, I can't get the machines to recognize each other.

Does anyone out there have any tips or suggestions? I know this question is a little vague, but believe me, I don't even know where to begin here.

If anyone can shed any light on this, I'd be eternally in your debt. I really wanna make this work, if I can.

Thanks in advance for any info anyone can provide.

Cheers,

Snaithbert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
You need to ensure that on both machines under the connection properties of the LAN connection that in addition to the "Internet TCP/IP " option being enabled you have both of the following enabled (ticked):

- Client for Microsoft Networks
- File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks.

The machines also need to be in the same workgroup (check the name is the same and no trailing spaces).

While you are at you could check the TCP/IP properites on each machine (using the ipconfig/all command) to ensure the PCs are in the same sub-net (they should be if both are getting IP data from the router as the DHCP server).

To shares files or folders then you need to specifically set sharing in the properties of the folder/file.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
As well, note that the XP machine will not automatically allow access to it. You need to either enable the Guest Account or add a new account that is the same as the account that is logged into the Win98 machine.

Can you ping each machine?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, I got it to work.

Somehow.

I was actually about to throw in the towel, when amazingly, computer 2 began giving me access to computer 1.

But I have no idea HOW i got it to work, which troubles me a bit.

I tried to so many different methods that I have no clue which one was the one that finally worked.

Right now it's set up so that on computer 2, I can view folders on on computer 1 that are marked for sharing.

If they're not marked, I can't view or access them.

That's basically what I wanted, so I guess I shouldn't complain.

Though I'd love to know how I got there, in case I ever need to do it again.

And I have to admit, I'm a little worried about safety now, because as I was doing this, I got umpteen messages saying that networking increases security risks, etc.

I'm kind of of worried that in my ineptitude, I've accidentally set up my network so that strangers on the internet can access all the files on both computers.

Can anyone help me check the settings on both machines, to make sure this isn't the case?

I want to share files between both computers- but not with the outside world.

As always, any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Lastly: what's pinging?

I've heard the word, but not sure of the meaning.

Thanks again,

Snaithbert
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
106,726 Posts
As long as you're behind the NAT layer of the router, and don't open a lot of ports to the outside, networking doesn't affect your security to any real degree.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
johnwill, thanks for the info.

May I trouble you for a bit of clarification?

I'm really really new at this.

What is the "NAT layer" of the router?

And how do I open ports?

I'm worried I may have opened them already or something.

I did a LOT of stuff to make the network work, some of which may not have been smart. Because after a while it was all trial and error, in a "well, let's see if this works" sort of way and I'm afraid I may have left myself open to online threats in the process.

Any last minute thoughts on this, perhaps just a quick way I can check and make sure I'm secure?

Maybe?

Thanks again,

Snaithbert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,468 Posts
This is not entirely accurate but will be close enough to hopefully answer your question.

Think of your system as having two IP addresses. One is the public IP address of your DSL router or cable modem. This is the IP address that is reachable from others on the Internet. For example, you can ping the IP address of my cable modem.

If the cable modem is connected to a router, that router will provide a totally different IP scheme for your local network. For example, 192.168.1.x. This Network Address Translation is just the fancy phrase for how the router keeps track of all that. It is also why your internal IP addresses can't be so easily accessed over the Internet and is what helps the router act as a firewall.

As far as open ports, this is generally something you would need to have manually done on the router. If you don't know how to do it, then likely it hasn't been done.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top