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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
no it was like this when i bought it. People here in my country don't sell quality stuff. I don't game all the time though 2 hours tops a day unless games i've been waiting for are out
 

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The max thermal spec for that cpu is around 71C so IF your reading of 92C is correct, then you have a problem.

Here is what I would do;
1 Since this is 2yrs old, pull the hsf off and clean ALL parts with 99% or 91% alcohol
2 Apply fresh thermal compound such as arctic silver or other compound
3 Reinstall the hsf
4 Make sure you have all cables, wires, etc tied up and out of the way so you can get good airflow through the case

Note for intel type cpus, I always recommend pulling the motherboard to R&R a hsf. This is for two reasons;
1 With the board out of the case, you can check the 4 pushpins to make sure they are fully engaged
2 You need to push pretty hard on the board to seat the pushpins and I dislike having to push so hard on the board when it is supported on standoffs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
re applied the thermal paste and it's running at 43c idle but it still reaches about 100c BUT before it was underclocking itself to prevent overheating but now when i ran a stress test it isn't underclocking itself it's running at a constant stock speed
Edit: It was a really low quality thermal paste but probably the only i could find in a place like here
 

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It sounds as if you may have an airgrap between the heatsink and the processor heatspreader. Try this procedure.

Unplug the machine from the power source and press and hold the ON button for about 15-30 seconds to drain any residual power from the capacitors.

Take a flat blade screwdriver and turn the locking pins counterclockwise to begin the unlock procedure, then holding the cooler to keep it from moving lift up GENTLY on each pin to complete the unlock procedure. After the pins are unlocked unplug the fan from the motherboard header and lift straight up on the cooler to remove it.

After the cooler is removed clean the processor heatspreader and heatsink with isopropyl alcohol making sure both surfaces are absolutely clean and dry. After both surfaces are clean and dry, apply 2 drops (about 2 bb's size) of the thermal compound right in the center of the processor heat spreader. You do not have to manually spread the compound. When the heatsink locks down to the motherboard it will do so with at least 17 (f/lb) of pressure so the compound will
spread itself.

Before putting the cooler in place make sure the fan wires are in a position where they cannot be caught between the cooler and the processor heatspreader. The fan should be positioned so that the run of the fan wires to the motherboard header is by the shortest route.

Turn the locking pin assemblies until the notch on the locking pins are perpendicular to the heatsink. Re-align the locking pins with the holes in the motherboard. Push down on the cooler and, push down FIRMLY on each pin individually. Push down on the pins in a sequence diagonal to each other. After all 4 pins are down and locked push down FIRMLY on each pin individually again. When starting the lock down procedure, It is very important that
the notches on the locking pins are perpendicular to the heatsink or the heatsink will not lock down.


Some people prefer to push down on two pins diagonally from each other to lock the cooler to the motherboard. Pushing two pins at a time or pushing 1 pin at a time diagonally from each other works equally well, just remember if you push one pin at a time you must hold the cooler to keep the other pins aligned with the holes in the motherboard. Choose the method that best suits you.

Reconnect the processor fan to the motherboard fan header. Reconnect the machine to the power source. Power on the machine and check the temperatures.
 

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As an additional note, the standard Intel cooler as shipped with a processor is designed for normal home/office use. It is not designed to be used for heavy gaming, overclocking, etc. If the machine is used for heavy gaming or is overclocked you should look for a 3rd party cooler.
 
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