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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been having some really strange issues with Vista 64 when turning my computer on or restarting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

The problems started about a couple weeks ago. I usually leave it on all the time, and one day when I got home from work the monitor was turned off and not responding to keyboard/mouse (usually shuts off after 10 min.). I forced the monitor to turn on, but it was not receiving a signal so I hit the reset button on my computer. When it started booting up it stopped at a black screen with "Intel Boot Agent" or something saying that it couldn't find a hard drive to boot off of. I hit reset again, and the same thing happened. Then, I shut it off completely and turned it on after a few minutes and it booted fine.

Then, this week the same thing happened, except when I turned on the computer after powering down it displayed the mouse cursor briefly and then sat at a black screen for a long time (I actually stepped out of the room). When I came back, the computer had apparently restarted itself and was waiting for me to enter my password (I have it set to ask for a password during startup). I powered down and then turned it on again, and when it prompted, I entered safe mode and moved all important files from my C: drive to D: drive. I restarted and it seemed to boot okay, though quite slowly.

Then the other day the same thing happened again, so I put my Vista disc to try and repair the system, but it didn't detect an OS (or even my C: drive.. only my actual D: drive, which it was registering as C: ). I turned off and turned on again, and it did detect the C: drive, but the result of the repair said everything was fine, and it then booted slowly, but otherwise fine.

Yesterday, I turned it on when I got home from work (at this point I was shutting it down before I went to bed and turning it on when I got home) and again it sat at a black screen for a while. I stepped out of the room and when I came back it was on a BSOD with the following message:

STOP: c000021 {Fatal System Error}
The initial session process or system process terminated unexpectedly with a status of 0x00000000 (0xc0000221 0x00100390). The system has been shut down.

I turned it off and have been afraid to turn back on since then. What should I do? I am okay with reinstalling Vista/reformatting my C: drive, but I have a lot of data on my D: drive that I don't want to lose. Can I reinstall Vista/reformat C: without affecting D:? The help pop-up that opens in the Vista disc bootup menu says that reinstalling Vista will wipe out all personal data.
 

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hi and welcome to the forum this is what i found on error 0x00000000
STOP Messages literally mean Windows has stopped! These appear only in the NT-based operating systems: Win NT, Win 2000, Win XP, and Vista. Most are hardware issues. STOP messages are identified by an 8-digit hexadecimal number, but also commonly written in a shorthand notation; e.g., a STOP 0x0000000A may also be written Stop 0xA. Four additional 8-digit hex numbers may appear in parentheses, usually unique to your computer and the particular situation.
NOTE: Many users search this site for the word minidump which often accompanies these Stop Message errors. The fact that a memory minidump occurred tells you nothing except what you already know - that there was an error. It is the name of the error condition and its 8-digit number that help you determine the actual error condition.
If a message is listed below, but has no articles or explanation (nothing but its number and name), post a request on the AumHa Forums asking about it. STOP messages of this type are rare, obscure, and usually only of interest to programmers debugging their code. Real-life scenarios of a computer user encountering them are unlikely, so I've made it a lower priority to document them here; but we'll be happy to address this in the Forum (which also will tip me off that I should add more to this present page).

General Troubleshooting of STOP Messages

If you can't find a specific reference to your problem, running through the following checklist stands a good chance of resolving the problem for you. This checklist is also usually the best approach to troubleshooting some specific Stop messages, such as 0x0A and 0x50.
  1. Examine the "System" and "Application" logs in Event Viewer for other recent errors that might give further clues. To do this, launch EventVwr.msc from a Run box; or open "Administrative Tools" in the Control Panel then launch Event Viewer.
  2. If you've recently added new hardware, remove it and retest.
  3. Run hardware diagnostics supplied by the manufacturer.
  4. Make sure device drivers and system BIOS are up-to-date.
  5. However, if you've installed new drivers just before the problem appeared, try rolling them back to the older ones.
  6. Open the box and make sure all hardware is correctly installed, well seated, and solidly connected.
  7. Confirm that all of your hardware is on the Hardware Compatibility List. If some of it isn't, then pay particular attention to the non-HCL hardware in your troubleshooting.
  8. Check for viruses.
  9. Investigate recently added software.
  10. Examine (and try disabling) BIOS memory options such as caching or shadowing.
NOTE: When a STOP message occurs, Windows can create a debug file for very detailed analysis. To do this, it needs a workspace equal to the amount of physical RAM you have installed. If you resize your Win XP pagefile minimum to less than the size of your physical RAM, you will get an advisory message that your system may not be able to create a debugging information file if a STOP error occurs. My advice is to go ahead with this change if you want, but simply remember the limitation so that you can change it back if you need to troubleshoot STOP messages. Some general troubleshooting principles are suggested in the Resource Kit for approaching STOP messages overall.

0x00000001: APC_INDEX_MISMATCH MSDN article
0x00000002: DEVICE_QUEUE_NOT_BUSY MSDN article
0x00000003: INVALID_AFFINITY_SET MSDN article
0x00000004: INVALID_DATA_ACCESS_TRAP MSDN article


0x00000005: INVALID_PROCESS_ATTACH_ATTEMPT
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So... can I reinstall Vista without erasing the data on my D: drive? The whole problem is that I'm not able to get to Vista so I'm not sure how I would debug.
 

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Hi

Ive read through your problem and this sounds like a good old case of hard-drive failure to me. The Best way to get through a Situation like this is to back up all your important data on a different drive which I see you have already done...Well done for taking the initiative...after you have done that format the drive completely...no quick format stuff...re-install. If this doesnt work you will have to try with a different hard-drive.

Hard-drive problems usually start off small and get worse and worse...these kinds of problems tend to accelerate very quickly the more you use the computer. A windows file system error would not be so intermittent.

Hard-drive failure is a very common thing, but let me know how it goes

Hope this advice helps
 

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There article joeten copied came from here: http://www.aumha.org/a/stop.htm
(Really should provide the link or use the Webquote function so the OP can do further research, and to give the author proper credit)
You can scroll down that page to read when he has for the Stop: 0xC000021A error (looks like you left the A off), though it appears geared more for XP than Vista.

A hard drive that comes and goes could be a bad connection. If a laptop, remove then re-insert the hard drive, if a Desktop, unplug then re-connect the cables.
It could also be a dying hard drive.

Malware can also cause this stop error, but the fact that the Intel Boot Agent appeared, and the repair disk doesn't see the drive makes me agree with Mrs1n1st3r that this is a hardware issue.

A Format and Re-install to C: won't affect data on D:, just make sure you format the correct drive/partition.
If the D: drive is actually a partition on the same hard drive as C:. I'd recommend copying that data to another drive ASAP.
 
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