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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear folks

NESS D8XD alarm system installed on a business for my friend and a technician who installed it he said he didn't change the alarm system default ip address.

http://nesscorporation.com/ness-security/ness-control-panels/home-security/k-6308.html

Default ip is 192.168.0.251 ,,,as per the advise of their National Customer Service Centre,,,I called them and spoke with them

The confusing part I can ping this ip address (192.168.0.251) but it is neither in the list of the attached wired devices nor in the list of attached wireless devices (any way NESS is a wired box)

Snapshot below is for the attached wired devices :


And the ping result is below :

Code:
C:\WINDOWS\System32>ping 192.168.0.251
Pinging 192.168.0.251 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.0.251: bytes=32 time=6ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.0.251: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.0.251: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
Reply from 192.168.0.251: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
Ping statistics for 192.168.0.251:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 2ms, Maximum = 6ms, Average = 3ms
Confusion how can I ping the ip address and it is not listed in my router table ???

Thanks
 

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Confusion how can I ping the ip address and it is not listed in my router table ???
Does your "router table" show all connected devices? Or, like my router, does it show only all the devices connected with a dynamic (DHCP) IP address but not the ones with a static IP?

If the latter, you have your answer.
 

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If you have other connected devices with a static IP look to see if they show up in the table.

Or experiment--temporarily set a computer or smart phone or tablet to use a static IP and see if that static IP shows up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you have other connected devices with a static IP look to see if they show up in the table.

Or experiment--temporarily set a computer or smart phone or tablet to use a static IP and see if that static IP shows up.
The ip address 192.168.0.200 in the attached snapshot is for printer and it is static
 

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Then I do not know the answer.

From the scroll bar on the right of your attachment you've shown less than half the table, and the IP addresses are "scrambled," so make sure you have looked at all entries and the .251 is really not there.
 

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So, mystery solved; the router just needed to be "refreshed." :)

You can mark this thread solved using the "Mark Solved" above the first post on this page.
 

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To explain what is going on here, the reason the router did not see the IP address of the alarm system in its attached devices table is because no traffic has gone through the router from the alarm system. If you did a PING test from the router to the alarm system, you'll see the device show up. It has to do with the ARP (address resolution protocol) table.

Why the router now sees the alarm system when it was rebooted is when network devices are brought on line, they'll typically send out a gratuitous ARP which is a broadcast across the LAN to help pre-populate the network device's ARP table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To explain what is going on here, the reason the router did not see the IP address of the alarm system in its attached devices table is because no traffic has gone through the router from the alarm system. If you did a PING test from the router to the alarm system, you'll see the device show up. It has to do with the ARP (address resolution protocol) table.

Why the router now sees the alarm system when it was rebooted is when network devices are brought on line, they'll typically send out a gratuitous ARP which is a broadcast across the LAN to help pre-populate the network device's ARP table.
Yes it makes sense
Thanks for this clarification
 
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