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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To mark his birthday, I was starting to write a piece about Dr. King and the media but then remembered that what I wanted to say had already been written way back in l995 by Norman Solomon and Jeff Cohen. I am sure they won't mind if I reprint it here for any of you who are checking out the MediaChannel on our long stuggle for Dr. King holiday weekend in the USA:

The Martin Luther King You Don't See On TV

By Jeff Cohen and Norman Solomon

"It's become a TV ritual: Every year in mid-January, around the time of Martin Luther King's birthday, we get perfunctory network news reports about "the slain civil rights leader."

The remarkable thing about this annual review of King's life is that several years ? his last years ? are totally missing, as if flushed down a memory hole.

What TV viewers see is a closed loop of familiar file footage: King battling desegregation in Birmingham (1963); reciting his dream of racial harmony at the rally in Washington (1963); marching for voting rights in Selma, Alabama (1965); and finally, lying dead on the motel balcony in Memphis (1968).

An alert viewer might notice that the chronology jumps from 1965 to 1968. Yet King didn't take a sabbatical near the end of his life. In fact, he was speaking and organizing as diligently as ever.

Almost all of those speeches were filmed or taped. But they're not shown today on TV.

Why?

It's because national news media have never come to terms with what Martin Luther King Jr. stood for during his final years.

In the early 1960s, when King focused his challenge on legalized racial discrimination in the South, most major media were his allies. Network TV and national publications graphically showed the police dogs and bullwhips and cattle prods used against Southern blacks who sought the right to vote or to eat at a public lunch counter.

But after passage of civil rights acts in 1964 and 1965, King began challenging the nation's fundamental priorities. He maintained that civil rights laws were empty without "human rights" ? including economic rights. For people too poor to eat at a restaurant or afford a decent home, King said, anti-discrimination laws were hollow.

Noting that a majority of Americans below the poverty line were white, King developed a class perspective. He decried the huge income gaps between rich and poor, and called for "radical changes in the structure of our society" to redistribute wealth and power.

"True compassion," King declared, "is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring."

By 1967, King had also become the country's most prominent opponent of the Vietnam War, and a staunch critic of overall U.S. foreign policy, which he deemed militaristic. In his "Beyond Vietnam" speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 ? a year to the day before he was murdered ? King called the United States "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today."

From Vietnam to South Africa to Latin America, King said, the U.S. was "on the wrong side of a world revolution." King questioned "our alliance with the landed gentry of Latin America," and asked why the U.S. was suppressing revolutions "of the shirtless and barefoot people" in the Third World, instead of supporting them.

In foreign policy, King also offered an economic critique, complaining about "capitalists of the West investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa and South America, only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment of the countries."

You haven't heard the "Beyond Vietnam" speech on network news retrospectives, but national media heard it loud and clear back in 1967 ? and loudly denounced it. Time magazine called it "demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi." The Washington Post patronized that "King has diminished his usefulness to his cause, his country, his people."

In his last months, King was organizing the most militant project of his life: the Poor People's Campaign. He crisscrossed the country to assemble "a multiracial army of the poor" that would descend on Washington ? engaging in nonviolent civil disobedience at the Capitol, if need be ? until Congress enacted a poor people's bill of rights. Reader's Digest warned of an "insurrection."

King's economic bill of rights called for massive government jobs programs to rebuild America's cities. He saw a crying need to confront a Congress that had demonstrated its "hostility to the poor" ? appropriating "military funds with alacrity and generosity," but providing "poverty funds with miserliness."

How familiar that sounds today, more than a quarter-century after King's efforts on behalf of the poor people's mobilization were cut short by an assassin's bullet.

As 1995 gets underway, in this nation of immense wealth, the White House and Congress continue to accept the perpetuation of poverty. And so do most mass media. Perhaps it's no surprise that they tell us little about the last years of Martin Luther King's life".

Jeff Cohen and Norman Solomon are syndicated columnists and authors of Adventures in Medialand: Behind the News, Beyond the Pundits (Common Courage Press).

www.fair.org
 

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Martin luther King was a great man and visionary, he did his -I have a dream- speech on my birthday, which I think about every birthday, He was assasinated before he could have done so much, the same fate of many great leaders before and after him. He was considered a threat to National security, which goes way deeper than that. Kennedy was a threat too, You can be a mortal danger by standing up to our government and it's many wrongs, from our own Government or fringe fanatics, you could be snuffed out. The bottom line is we lost a treasure that graced this Earth with his presence. I don't see a great black man, I see a great human being.
 

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A True Heart and Soul - Gone But Never Forgotten
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One of the great moral leaders of our times, changed all of our lives. Some people just can't stand that. Others just want to minimize it. Izme, what you said was beautiful, and oh so true.
 

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eggplant43 said:
One of the great moral leaders of our times, changed all of our lives. Some people just can't stand that. Others just want to minimize it. Izme, what you said was beautiful, and oh so true.
Thanks man ;):up:

We need the great one's to make great changes, how would all of our lives be if we had not lost so many in our past? I could name off many, and not just from this Country. From great chiefs to world leaders, they left their mark's on us all in some way. And we are not what we could have been if we wouldn't have lost them.
 

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linskyjack said:
Its a shame that his ideal of non-violent demonstration has not been picked up by people who want to make change---Just look at the Middle East.
Why cry for the wrongs in peacefull display when you can yell out your cause via rocket launcher? Which makes a more profound statement? They believe that extreme violence is the answer, I believe - peaceful protest. The very essence of acheiving peace is to create it.
 

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He was one of the greatest men from this country. I have complete respect for him, and I still love reading his speeches all the time. He is so inspiring. There's so much we can all learn from his message. I remember when he said "When you are right, you cannot be too radical; When you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative." :up:

His words had a way of reaching your soul. His words are timeless and still hold true. "Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men. We must all learn to live together as brothers, or we are all going to perish together as fools."
 

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Wet Chicken said:
His words had a way of reaching your soul. His words are timeless and still hold true. "Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men. We must all learn to live together as brothers, or we are all going to perish together as fools."
It's because he spoke from his heart and had a real love for America for which it stands, something we lack now days ;)
 

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Wet Chicken said:
He was one of the greatest men from this country. I have complete respect for him, and I still love reading his speeches all the time. He is so inspiring. There's so much we can all learn from his message. I remember when he said "When you are right, you cannot be too radical; When you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative." :up:

His words had a way of reaching your soul. His words are timeless and still hold true. "Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men. We must all learn to live together as brothers, or we are all going to perish together as fools."
:up: He was one of the greatest, and I too, love to read his words---they speak to all.
I recently concluded contract talks with a Florida company and in contract, managed to get Dr.Kings day off with pay for employees.
Some of the "********" later told me , they wished another 4 n****r activists were slain---so they could have a whole week off. They were joking---but serious. So much for ********, I wished I didn't have to represent them. Sad state of affairs in the south---still. >f
 

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A True Heart and Soul - Gone But Never Forgotten
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I understand that both life and history move in cycles. We are living in an age of impatience, instant gratification, and a need for a CLEAR, absolute truth. I believe it will eventually be discovered that none of these ideas are tenable. That we must all, not just the people that are just like us, move in harmony toward a common good.

I believe that Dr. King understood this truth in such a compelling, powerful way that it moved millions, and still does. It is written that the meek shall inherit the earth. Is this just a cruel joke, or a truth not yet realized? I believe it to be a truth not yet realized. So did Dr. king.

Peace out. :)
 

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Fidelista said:
Some of the "********" later told me , they wished another 4 n****r activists were slain---so they could have a whole week off. They were joking---but serious. So much for ********, I wished I didn't have to represent them. Sad state of affairs in the south---still. >f
It would have been very hard for me to restrain my words if that was said to me, I have gotten into some real heated arguments over racism, I will not tolerate it, it is not the way a human being should be, especially in this day and age. I remember talking to some people about how if I was younger and in the south I would have helped the Black people and got on the bus with them or? Usually followed by a remark that I would have been killed, which is one feasable and shocking comment, even today. Sometimes I think that all of these Aryans or Jihaadist's or whatever have so much in common, causing harm to the futures of the entire human race for a notion of self worth? Much more than that or is it lack of much more that makes these hatefull actions so profound? Ignorance is not always bliss, sometimes it's loaded for bear ;)
 

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eggplant43 said:
I understand that both life and history move in cycles. We are living in an age of impatience, instant gratification, and a need for a CLEAR, absolute truth. I believe it will eventually be discovered that none of these ideas are tenable. That we must all, not just the people that are just like us, move in harmony toward a common good.

I believe that Dr. King understood this truth in such a compelling, powerful way that it moved millions, and still does. It is written that the meek shall inherit the earth. Is this just a cruel joke, or a truth not yet realized? I believe it to be a truth not yet realized. So did Dr. king.

Peace out. :)
I trully believe that America was founded from the heart and we have lost much of it to today, maybe that's what we are really looking for
 

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izme said:
I trully believe that America was founded from the heart
Most of our leaders today are founded more in heartburn, then in heart :eek: :D
 

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TY XICO

Funny how you did that. You see, late this afternoon I was invited to attend a memorial for Dr. King. The venue included music, then passages read by some of us of a speech King had given.

Here I am, white, middle class, fairly well educated following one of King's speeches and not recognizing it. So much so, that it took me back. I left the memorial saying to myself, "There was much, much more than the traditional civil rights movement I had so come to indentify him with."

XICO - When I read your post, it was exactly what I had been thinking about less than one hour ago.

Dr. King took us somewhere discussing racial issues, but he was continuing to lead us to face broader issues, issues that if addressed, would go far, far to deal with the base issue of racism.

Economic justice for all would and could have such a healing effect on the people of this world.

I left that memorial wondering if I would enter public life again. I left wondering if I can avoid not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Cool Rep! :cool:

Syncronicity! The System is trying to bleach MLK out of existence, keeping us focused on symptoms rather than causes. LOL Now they wanna give us a "domesticated version" of the "real" man. It's not a lie; it just isn't the truth. They know better than to outright lie, cos they wouldn't get away with that; so, like everything else they touch, they neuter his message, hoping that no one will remember what he really was saying.

Too bad some of us do remember :eek: :D :up:
 

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An excellent 1st post & thread. Thank you xico. Stirring my heart & that of everyone reading, I'm sure :up:

I could swear that, not just myself, but millions of intelligent and loving people around the world are quietly, (subconciously even?) wishing for & planning a revolution of sorts...

There has always been injustice in the world, but it is the continuing CRIMES of the powerful and greedy - individuals, families, corporations and governments that have been allowed for too long.

It was the Iraq War that sealed it for me. I and the majority of Britons (possibly even majority of Americans) were against the invasion of Iraq at that time.... BUT THEY DID IT ANYWAY !

And now it seems many of the reasons given for the war (WoMD), were outright lies. And 'they' still get away with it.

Our 'leaders' still seem to place economic prosperity, for some of 'us' in the west, over human life.
(and of course, for many, an Asian, African or Iraqi life is NOT valued equally to an American or European life). How discustingly, racistly selfish.

I do hope we, the human race, can make some real changes to our priorities in this world.

Enough is enough !

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/politics/story.jsp?story=601956
just came across this news story - some people really are trying

http://www.makepovertyhistory.org/
Please sign up for massive peaceful request to our most powerful governments to help reduce world poverty.

Love and peace for all
abbyk
 
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