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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the company behind kazaa is being sued after a judge said that even though their company and everything about them is out of U.S jurisdiction because they do a sizable amount of bussiness in california,he said they can be sued.does anyone have more information on this? what do you think will happen to kazaa?and what if their company goes down, the software will still be out there.would the software still be usable?
 

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Kazaa has been sued tons and tons of times.
Napster went down after a lawsuit, but mostly because they couldnt afford the lawyers.
I'm pretty sure the Gnutella network needs central servers, so Kazaa would not still work, but the servers main job would be to alert users as to which computers are supernodes, and to connect the computers to eachother for searching files, etc. and its possible that this could be duplicated and still work with kazaa.
 

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I guess that depends on what your definition of "business" is. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
heres where i got my nfo from this is the article from jan. 13th 03
from the fox news web site www.foxnews.com

LOS ANGELES — A federal judge has given record companies and movie studios the go-ahead to sue the parent company of Kazaa, a popular online file-swapping service.

U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson refused to dismiss a copyright infringement lawsuit against Sharman Networks Ltd., which had argued that it could not be sued in the United States because it is based in Australia and incorporated in the South Pacific nation of Vanuatu.

In a 46-page ruling issued Friday, the judge said Sharman is subject to U.S. copyright laws because it has substantial business dealings in California and its actions are alleged to contribute to commercial piracy within the United States.

Kelly Larabee, a Sharman spokeswoman, said that while the company was "disappointed" with the ruling on the case, "we fully expect to prevail on the merits."

Larabee said Sharman would be filing a counterclaim that will "set forth the full story for the first time."

The Sharman case is one of the largest in the recent online copyright wars testing the international reach of U.S. courts. The plaintiffs maintain that Kazaa provides free access to copyrighted music and films to about 21 million U.S. users.
 
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