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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tonight, I tried to turn on my computer with no success except for with a boot disk.

I can get into my bios just fine and what I see is that the bios thinks my hard disks do not exist.

There is a utility to autodetect hard drives and it cannot find any evidence that I even have any drives.

My system is an AMD k6.2 333mhz with 320MB ram and two disks which should be:

C: 4GB (partitioned as 2 - 2GB)
D: 12GB Maxtor add in.
E: 36x cdrom (this it finds)
f: Zip 250MB paralell (no clue if this one is anything since I cannot get far enough in to tell)
 

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Hi Malpine, welcome to TSG....

If you can't re-recognize them in your bios setup, you're going to have to open the computer and check your connections. It sounds as if something has wiggled loose.
 

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Hi Malpine

It sounds more like a cabling problem, Try reseating the data and power cables to the hard drives and recheck the MS/SL jumpers. Do both drives spin up at bootup? If your bios still can't see the drives try removing one at a time to see if they can be detected. BOL
 

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Cables coming loose maybe a good bet, you might wanna try the first option in your bios which brings up details of your drives, make sure they are all turned to Auto, this isnt autodetect as it forces your bios to look for new drives everytime you boot up. This solved a drive problem for me once.

GL
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone for your advise.

I checked the cables as suggested. No luck there, all the cables are nice and tight.

I did one test that was impossible last night. I put a different hard drive in as my primary master. With that drive in, the computer boots fine, leading me to suspect that the C: drive is a major cause of the problem.

However, I now have a new symptom. No matter which drive is the primary master, the bios now cannot find my cd-rom (which is the secondary master).

Also, with the old primary master drive in, the bios now has no problem finding the primary slave (the 13GB HD).

I am open to any ideas here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The replacement drive that I used for testing purposes has no jumpers. The manufatureres website does not offer support for hard drives any more but I remember looking it up when i moved it to another computer last year. I believe that it had some type of "autosense" that allowed it to self configure.

In any case, the CDROM is the seconday master drive and there is no secondary slave. I would not think that a problem with the primay master would affect the secondary drives.

I can test the possibly bad drive in another computer to se if it can be detected by a different BIOS. Would that provide useful information?
 

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Anything that can be ruled out is one step closer to solving the original problem. :)

On the other drive, you may look at the bottom, if it's older, that where some jumpers used to be.
 
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