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Someone gave a floppy with a title of GHOST on it. It contains the following folder/files:
Ghost folder, ibmbio.com; ibmdos.com; mouse.com; mouse.ini. The Ghost folder contains Ghost.exe, ghost.ini, ghosterr.txt.

I don't want to click on the executable unless I know what it does and how I use it. If someone can provide me with the info on this I would appreciate it.

TIA
 

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Ghost is a program that will create an image of your current disk and place it on some media as a (usually) single large file. That media being used for storage may be an other hard drive, another partition of the same hard drive, a network file server, a CD or DVD writer, even a USB drive. As long as your media has the capacity and capability of being reached by the Ghost imaging program, you can use that media.

The Ghost process requires the licensed program (some setups require your entering a keycode during the process, and/or during the recovery process).

Once you have the image stored wherever, then to recover the image requires the program you have on floppy. (The recovery program actually does not have to be on a floppy, but it is one of the more common methods.) So, you boot up with that "Ghost" disk, and at the correct prompts, direct it to where you have your stored disk image, and allow the process to "bring back" the image to get your hard drive back exactly the way it was on the day and moment it was when you created the image.

The floppy you have is not much use to you. You friend probably was under the impression that he is giving you something the will get your computer image stored. From what you described, it sounds like it is just the 2nd part you have, the recovery process. Not the initial "save my disk image" part.

It should not hurt anything to boot up with the disk, since you don't have a somename.GHO image file for it to use to place back on your hard drive. You could boot up to see what the screens look like, if you want. You are going to come to a end point really quickly anyway.

BTW, to "boot to floppy" means to place that floppy disk into your floppy drive of your computer (and some new computers are not coming with floppy drives) and then either turn on your computer, or just "restart" your computer, so that your computer will startup reading the required files from the floppy to install a usually minimal operating system (no, not Windows :) ) something like either DOS or a very basic graphic controlling interface so you can use your mouse and keyboard.
 
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