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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so if i factory press data onto a medium quality brand dvd (eg: maxell/brandless), at the same time i burn the exact data onto a excellent branded dvd (eg: vibatim), then i placed them both in a cd case and seal them in a very dark room for 30 years.

now i want to know:

which dvd will still be readable 30 years from now? the burnt one on the good quality dvd, or the factory pressed one on the poor quality dvd?


i have an unopened dell pc i reserved for "future" use, so please don't bash me for not knowing about the high chance of dvds becoming obsolete in 30 years.


thank you for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes yes i understand, but i simply wanted to know, would data pressed onto a medium quality disc survive longer than a burnt one onto a good quality disc.

thank you.
 

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yes yes i understand, but i simply wanted to know, would data pressed onto a medium quality disc survive longer than a burnt one onto a good quality disc.

thank you.
To my knowledge, it is the same technology. The factories simply have machines designed for higher production runs. I don't expect either one would survive longer than the other.

Even if there is a difference in lifespan, the odds that you'll need to access information that you burnt onto a disk 30 years from now are astronomical. We'll probably have gone through three format advancements in that time period.

Methinks you're worrying about nothing. :)
 

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I have no knowledge of small production run pressed disks but I wouldn't expect a PC-burnt DVD to have a hope in hell of lasting 30 years. I've had Verbatim 16x printable DVD-R's start glitching after between 2 and 3 years. Obviously the quality of the burner is significant. Also, I believe that slower-burned disks remain playable for longer than faster-burned ones. Other posters on here disagree.
Storing optical disks in a dark room is only the start of your necessary preparations - they don't like humidity or wide cyclical variations in temperature.
I think the only way in which you might extrapolate a reasonably accurate life expectancy is by researching the manufacturers' technical papers on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To my knowledge, it is the same technology. The factories simply have machines designed for higher production runs. I don't expect either one would survive longer than the other.

Even if there is a difference in lifespan, the odds that you'll need to access information that you burnt onto a disk 30 years from now are astronomical. We'll probably have gone through three format advancements in that time period.

Methinks you're worrying about nothing. :)
oh no! so my copy of sptrete VR and wing commanderII is going to go dead on me just as the poster above me and his vibatim dvds in a few more years?\

what should i do? T_T
 

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No, a factory pressed cd is totally different from a burnt cd. A factory pressed is just that, the data is pressed into a metallic layer that will not deteriorate over time. A CD-R uses dye that is burnt to record the data. The quality of the dye that is used and the care of the CD after burning is what will determine the life of the Disc.
 

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Blank gold MFSL discs are supposed to have a 300-year life span.
Makes sense, as gold is one of the least-reactive metals on the planet.
 
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