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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently put together my computer with the following specs:

MSI MPG Z690 CARBON WIFI motherboard
Intel Core i9-12900KF with Noctua NH-D15S and Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut
Corsair Vengeance 2x16GB dual channel DDR5 5600
MSI RTX 3090 Gaming X Trio
SAMSUNG 980 PRO M.2 1TB SSD
Seasonic PRIME TX-750 750W 80+ Titanium PSU
A very well-cooled case
nothing overclocked currently
Windows 10

The CPU is rated at 241 watts at absolute maximum, and I have 32 GB of RAM. Is it something I should expect to see thermal throttling or crashes when I run IntelBurnTest or CPU Stress Test - An online tool to test your CPU stability | CPU Expert at maximum settings? The temps are ideal when doing anything else such as gaming, internet browsing, etc. But during 100% CPU usage stress tests, the temps easily approach 100 C.

In previous computer builds, I was able to run IntelBurnTest indefinitely without thermal throttling, but I wonder if that may just be because they were like ~100 watt CPU's and 16 or less GB of RAM.
 

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If the system runs fine doing whatever it is you normally do, then you have three choices;
1 Leave it alone
2 Get a quality liquid cooler such as a corsair H115i or a H150i
3 Undervolt the processor in the bios. During a stress test with processor voltage set to AUTO, the motherboard often supplies too high a vcore or cpu voltage.

The 12th gen intels do run hot; nature of the beast. Intel is pumping a LOT of pw through the processor so as to be able to up the clockspeed. This is about the only way they are able to compete with the new AMD chips. If what I am reading on early benchmarks is correct, the 7000 series from AMD is going to blow the intels clean out of the water.
 

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If you do decide to undervolt the processor, read your motherboard manual. I never build with msi motherboards so I am not familiar with their bios menus. Most boards will have a max value OR there may be a +/- offset for voltage; again read the manual.
Start with the lowest amount you can undervolt or the minimum negative offset. See if that lowers the temps for you AND be sure and test for stability. If the temps are still too high for you, lower the voltage some more and restest.
 

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crjdriver is correct when he says the maximum is 100°C. I note Proved SEO said at highest loads, the "average" can go to 80-85°C, not the maximum. There is some truth in that too.

However, I also agree with Proved SEO and running any electronics device near its maximum allowed tempts for long periods of time will indeed increase the aging effect on the device.

That said, I do not like stress tests and benchmarking programs. They do not represent real-world scenarios and IMO, are good for nothing but bragging rights, misconceptions and disappointment.

The temps are ideal when doing anything else such as gaming, internet browsing, etc.
Then the old adage applies; "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm definitely not going to change the cooler; I spent too much and put too much work into it. I may just leave it be, or try undervolting. I might occasionally do video encoding, image processing, and crypto mining (if profitable or just to heat the room during winter). I imagine those will use the CPU a little less than IntelBurnTest.
 

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To the OP did you unlock PL limits in the BIOS? If you did and you may encounter some throttling with your 12900k when running stress tests depends on the setup -- yours is fine you might check the seating of the Noctua base on the processor (be sure it's seated evenly). They actually do run quite hot with PL unlocked especially a 12900k. Lesser for a 12700k and even less for the 12600k. I have built 18 12th Gen Intel systems so far. Your parts are good - a bit high on the temp for stress tests but for regular gaming and usage you should be fine. By the way I have been using stress tests since 2001 for every rig I sell.
 

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That said, I do not like stress tests and benchmarking programs. They do not represent real-world scenarios and IMO, are good for nothing but bragging rights, misconceptions and disappointment.
Then the old adage applies; "If it ain't broke, don't fix it!"
Couldn`t have put it any better for either.

Something that has not been mentioned is the OPs RAM.

Corsair Vengeance 2x16GB dual channel DDR5 5600
Also at the link provided by crdriver is the below;

Memory Types Up to DDR5 4800 MT/s

The appropriate RAM from the Corsair Vengeance range is here

Disabling XMP 3.0 and manually overclocking the RAM to 1,25V and 4800MHz or returning the present RAM (if they can) and getting the true 4800MHz spec are two options for the OP to consider.




 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
To the OP did you unlock PL limits in the BIOS? If you did and you may encounter some throttling with your 12900k when running stress tests depends on the setup -- yours is fine you might check the seating of the Noctua base on the processor (be sure it's seated evenly). They actually do run quite hot with PL unlocked especially a 12900k. Lesser for a 12700k and even less for the 12600k. I have built 18 12th Gen Intel systems so far. Your parts are good - a bit high on the temp for stress tests but for regular gaming and usage you should be fine. By the way I have been using stress tests since 2001 for every rig I sell.
Did not mess with overclocking or power settings yet. Only used XMP to get the advertised speeds for RAM.
 

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Did not mess with overclocking or power settings yet. Only used XMP t
XMP = Extreme Memory Profile is auto overclocking the RAM from its stock SPD speed to its tested speed, your RAM being DDR5 you only need to disable XMP for the RAM to work at its stock voltage of 1.1 and 4800MHz speed, I would do the below in all honesty as it will give you a clean start;

Restore the MBs default factory settings in the BIOS, they are sometimes listed as one of the following " factory defaults" "most stable" or on newer boards "optimized" please note that if you have both the "most stable" and the "optimized" options in the BIOS you should choose the most stable" option as in this instance the "optimized" settings are a form of overclocking that can cause instability.
To save you a bit of time, the below from your MBs user manual;

Resetting BIOS You might need to restore the default BIOS setting to solve certain problems. There are several ways to reset BIOS: ∙

Go to BIOS and press F6 to load optimized defaults.

Be sure to save the new settings before you exit the BIOS.
 

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I'm definitely not going to change the cooler; I spent too much and put too much work into it. I may just leave it be, or try undervolting. I might occasionally do video encoding, image processing, and crypto mining (if profitable or just to heat the room during winter). I imagine those will use the CPU a little less than IntelBurnTest.
If you're not going to change the cooler, then I recommend you try undervolting. Just do it gradually, and you should begin to see more acceptable temperatures.

Also here has some tips on managing your CPUs temperature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I can take a while getting around to doing modifications to BIOS settings and such to test things, but at least I tested crypto mining with the CPU, and it was 96% usage compared to 100% with the benchmark, and those few percent make a big difference in temperature. It stays around 77 C, compared to 95-100. This is the most intense real-world computing I will do, so I think I am comfortable for the time being. Thank you all for your help.
 
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