Tech Support Guy banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have collect quite a collection of home movies (vhs and digital camcorder) and would like to consolidate them onto a DVD. Is there any hardware out there that will allow me to hook up my VHS or camcorder and the stream the video onto the PC and then format it so I can burn it to a DVD. The DVD then needs to be able to show the home movies on a standard DVD player.

Thanks
Rick Anderson
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17,594 Posts
You just need a video capture card. (and a DVD burner of course...)

With a video capture card, the VHS tape video is converted in real time to a file, which can be made into a DVD or VCD using software such as Nero. Play it on the VHS tape player and record it on the PC.

Video capture cards are available as PCI cards, TV cards which also usually have Video Capture capabilities and some graphics vards have ViVo (Video In Video Out) capability to capture the video. Cards usually come with software to enable the capture.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,697 Posts
I'm not a fan of video capture cards. I was warned before I got my first one that there were compatibility issues between many internal cards and many main boards. I didn't listen and got an internal ATI card. I don't remember which model. After going through two internal cards, I decided to go for an external box, like I was advised in the first place to do by those who had 'been there, done that'.

I got the ADS conversion box. (http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,4149,1205047,00.asp) It won PC Magazine's Editor's Choice just a few months back. From that point, it was a simple matter of connecting the cords, loading the software and transferring movies--no muss, nor fuss--just smooth as silk.

After having fought the internal cards and beat my head against a wall for hours on end, I really know how to appreciate one that works just like it is supposed to work--the first time around.

Now, if I get another computer or swap boards, I don't have to worry whether my converter will be compatible with my new board. It plugs right into my USB port and away we go.

I would stay away from the Dazzle boxes. One of my sons and one of my daughters-in-law each have one and neither has ever gotten one to do sound--and Dazzle's tech support could not possibly be any worse even if they pulled out all their phones.

ADS has a new box out (http://pcmag.shopping.com/xPF-A_D_S_ADS_DVD_Xpress_USBAV701) at half the cost of mine; but, I know nothing first-hand about it.

Disclaimer
My usage: I use it to convert home movies from 8mm Kodak sound movies from the early 1970's played on a Kodak MovieDeck, projected into a projection box and captured with either a digital or analog movie camera and the ADS Instant DVD 2.0. Also, I have used it to capture movies directly from a VHS VCR to the ADS Instant DVD 2.0. I have not as yet used the editing software to do anything other than that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17,594 Posts
I have used my Video Card (Geoforce 4 MX 460) to capture VHS video using the Video In feature, and it works just fine.

You need reasonable resources though. I have 2 GHz P4, 512 MB RAM, 160 MB HDD which seems adequate. A P3 667 MHz dropped frames, so appeared underpowered for the task.

Hope that is helpful as a guide.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,697 Posts
I tried two ATI internal capture cards that I never got to work. I don't remember the models; but, one cost $150 and the other $200. The boards I tried here were Shuttle, DFI, MSI and Amptron, all with 512 Memory. The Shuttle and DFI boards have P4 2.4-GHz processors and the Amptron and MSI have AMD 2.4- and 2.0-GHz processors respectively. All use DDR RAM. and 80-Gig hard disks with 7200-RPM spin rates.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,018 Posts
Alex: seems that different systems have different responses to ATI cards...I've installed at least four of them (3 AIW cards and 1 TV), and never had a problem.

Ricewalker: the digital files are easy, just need firewire connection on your computer (assuming that is what is provided with your DV camcorder). Analog can be captured via the TV card, a capture card, or an external box.

My preference would be the TV card because when you are through, at least you have something else that card can be used for. You can also use it to capture snippets to add to your home movies....

Here is a good site to review to get started: www.dvdrhelp.com

Have fun,

MBN
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top