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To change from FAT 32 to NTFS file system for more stability, security and less fragmentation, open the command prompt and type:

Convert C: /FS:NTFS

"C" being the drive you wish to convert. Make sure there is a space between the C: and the foward slash (/). Once you press enter it will ask you for confirmation and press Y. Then press Y and enter once more to reboot.. This also works for windows XP Home.
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Is it safe to perform that little trick?
 

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OK. NTFS uses 4096 Byte clusters on all drives. FAT32 uses 4069 Byte clusters up to 8192Mb (8·0Gb)

I find that if you have a FAT32 drive with 4096 Byte clusters you can probably convert it safely.

Over 8192Mb FAT32 changes to 16384 Byte clusters, and things become less predictable.

When I tried to convert such a FAT32 drive I got 512 Byte clusters, which are too small, they tell me. So I just backed up the data to clear the drive and FULL formatted to NTFS to get 4096 Byte clusters.

All drives are now 4096 Byte NTFS drives.
 

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Are you doing this on XP or Windows 2000. Windows 2000 has issues with the cluster size when you convert to NTFS. It will end up making 512 byte cluseters instead of the normal 4Kb clusters. Running convert on XP works as it should.
 

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LwdSquashman said:
Are you doing this on XP or Windows 2000. Windows 2000 has issues with the cluster size when you convert to NTFS. It will end up making 512 byte clusters instead of the normal 4Kb clusters. Running convert on XP works as it should.
Not always. I have had it go wrong with XP. That was the example I was referring to.
 

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redsox13 said:
To change from FAT 32 to NTFS file system for more stability, security and less fragmentation, open the command prompt and type:

Convert C: /FS:NTFS

"C" being the drive you wish to convert. Make sure there is a space between the C: and the foward slash (/). Once you press enter it will ask you for confirmation and press Y. Then press Y and enter once more to reboot.. This also works for windows XP Home.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Is it safe to perform that little trick?
You cannot convert back to fat32 unless you reformat the c: drive
 

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RAM-PAGE said:
I am told that you can, by using Partition Magic, but I have never tried it and don't know if you have to take the data off the drive.
Yes with Partition magic, but not many people have got it. What do you mean by taking the data off the drive?
 

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RAM-PAGE said:
I was wondering if you can convert back, only on an empty drive.
i.e. Backup all the data and delete it from the drive before converting.
im not quite sure, as i use partition magic if i do a absolute reformat where i have to make it an active partition. I wouldnt like to try it unless i had it all backed up. I suppose you could do it, as you can make two paritions out of one hard drive and resize them whenever so i would say yes you prop could convert back
 

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RAM-PAGE said:
I am very cautious now after losing a drive through resizing partitions.

Thanks for the info. :)
Losing a drive??

What program did you use?
How much free space did u have on the drive when you did it?
How many paritions were on there, and what operating system have you got?
Did you check for errors on the disc before doing it as this can have a impact?

Thanks
 

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LwdSquashman said:
I have never seen it happen on XP. Microsoft only notes it as a problem on Windows 2000.
Just happened the once on drive E: I seem to remember. Converting from FAT32 at 16384 Bytes per cluster to NTFS and getting 512 Bytes per cluster.

I later wanted to try Mandrake Linux 10, so I imaged drive C: (Exactly 8192Mb at 4096 Bytes per cluster FAT32) with XP on it and then formatted from NTFS to FAT32.

When I put XP back on, I forgot to re-format to NTFS and used convert to get it back, but this time actually got 4192 Bytes per cluster.

What seems to happen is that if you have formatted to a certain number of bytes per cluster, format will replicate whatever is on the drive unless you delete the drive and make a new partition.

For example. If I have a FAT32 drive of 8192Mb and format to FAT32 getting 4192 Bytes per cluster and then use a partition resizer to make the partition bigger than 8192Mb which would normally give 16384 Bytes per cluster, format picks up on the first part of the drive, "says" to itself, this drive is formatted to 4192 Bytes per cluster and continues to format over the 8192Mb limit to the same figure. So you can extend an 8192Mb drive formatted to FAT32 and 4192 Bytes per cluster out to 30Gb using a resizer and format and still get 4192 Bytes for the full 30Gb.

If you delete the drive, re-make it and format, you get the default sizes.

So to be perfectly sure of getting the right Bytes per cluster figure I find it is safer to delete the drive partitions and start over using FULL format to make sure that there is no problem when doing a clean install.

Nowadays I carefully work out what partition sizes I want and never change them without removing the data from the drive first of all. I now use a 10240Mb drive C: as it will format to 4096 (4k) for NTFS and 8192 (8k) for FAT32 as FAT32 systems seem to run better on 8k. ('98 is known to, for example.)

With bigger drive sizes it really is time to say goodbye to FAT32 and stay with NTFS. As long as the OS drive is imaged there usually never is a problem with recovery unless you get a total drive failure for some electro-mechanical reason.

It is a lot easier to work on television sets!

Someone in England brought out a clockwork radio. The drive spring runs a small generator. I wonder if the mechanism will run a laptop.
 
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