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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a network with an ADSL modem connecting to a router via Ethernet and then obviously all my workstations access Internet through the router. Now I can configure the router by entering its IP address into a web browser and it configuration screen comes up. Now I also want to be able to configure the Modem on the fly to... however when I put in the modems IP address into the web browser it fails... but if I bypass the router and just hook a work station directly to the Modem it work. Would anybody have any ideas whats going on?
 

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You cannot access your modem like you do a router. Try unplugging both then plugging in the modem. After a bit, the modem will provision itself on your ISP network and be assigned an IP address. When this is done, plug in your router. It will look for the modem and its IP address and then look for all the devices hooke up to it like you PC. XP should automatically detect this and find the IP it needs to connect to the internet. If not, try restarting your PC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply but thats not what I'm after

I'm connecting to the internet fine. I just want to access the configuration settings via a web browser. I know its possible because when I take the router out of the equasion it works fine.
 

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I'm not sure what you mean then. I'm a cable technician and I install alot of modems and I've never heard of getting into the modem via a web browser to do any configuring. What is it that you want to configure?
 

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There are alot of time where I'm sent to a call because people can connect to internet when connected straight to the modem but not when they use a router and most of the time its just the order in which they do things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well its a Siemens SpeedStream 4200 Ethernet/USB ADSL Modem according to the unit its self but it is called a router in the Manual that I downloaded of some german website. So it might be technicly a router with built in modem... but its only got one USB and Ethernet interface.

When you type the modem/routers IP address into the browser it gives me options to configure the phone number, Firewall, NAT... everything.
 

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Oh, I see, it's a combo router and modem. Even still, when you enter that IP into your browser you should still only get access to control the router settings. Let me ask, do you have both ethernet and USB connected to your PC?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well as you can see the from the manual it is referred to all the way through as a router and if you check out http://www.portforward.com/ and look up the 4200 under the listed router it has how to change the routers settings. I know it does not have all the call signs of a normal router (ie multiple ports)... but I would say that the Speedstream is technically a router with built in modem. And no im not using the USB port.
 

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It sounds as though there are two routers involved here-The Siemens and "...I have a network with an ADSL modem connecting to a router"
What's the make and model of the second router?
Ipconfig /all would help.
 

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Let's see this when connected directly to the Speedstream 4200, and again when connected through the router (make/model unknown)

Hold the Windows key and press R, then type CMD to open a command prompt:

Type the following command:

IPCONFIG /ALL

Right click in the command window and choose Select All, then hit Enter.
Paste the results in a message here.

If you are on a machine with no network connection, use a floppy, USB disk, or a CD-RW disk to transfer a text file with the information to allow pasting it here.
 

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Conflicting IP addresses can cause this, too.

If your modem is, say, 192.168.0.1
,
then your router must be on another subnet, and use, say,
192.168.1.1

Make sure to turn on "MAC cloning", as well, as it is off,
by default, on most Belkin and Linksys routers.

DO _NOT_ change the default subnet mask;
leave it at 255.255.255.0 , or "Class C",
because you need this for NAT to work properly
on your LAN, and for file and printer sharing to
work right.

If your router's default IP address is the same as that of your modem,
you'll have to change it, else you'll be looking at your router instead,
since a router can't forward packets addressed to itself. :)
It just loops back.

Also, don't forget to add your modem's IP address to your routing table,
or it won't work... it'll just time out.

Certain modems have DNS forwarding internally or provisionally disabled.
This was the case with me, when my home cable HSI provider had me hooked up with
a Toshiba modem. I swapped in a Motorola Surfboard 5120. Problem solved.

Please note:
Static routing is advised. Disable DNS on all your workstations,
unless you have a good reason not to do so (and I can't think of one).
Especially, the XP "setup wizard" is fatallly flawed, even on XP PRO.
You are FAR better off config'ing your TCP/IP stack manually.
It's not really that hard to do ( I have to, because I use Windows 2000
and Redhat 7.3). ;)

I don't know much about your modem, so here's a link to the manual.
http://shadow.sentry.org/~trev/adsl4200/docs/4x00UG_English.pdf

Also, another tip:

Put the following lines into your hosts file
(of course, your numbers and names WILL be different,
so don't use the LITERAL values below, as these are mine):

127.0.0.1 localhost
192.168.1.1 router
192.168.100.1 modem
192.168.1.101 main
192.168.1.102 robot
192.168.1.103 david
192.168.1.104 sara

After this, you can open any explorer window
or web browser, and type in "router" or "modem"
(without the quotes), and, VOILA! Your config page
comes up. No more typing in IP addresses that are
both hard to remember and easy to confuse.

Finally, a command line shortcut to edit hosts is:
Code:
notepad %systemroot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
 

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It sounds as though there are two routers involved here-The Siemens and "...I have a network with an ADSL modem connecting to a router"
What's the make and model of the second router?
Ipconfig /all would help.
No, he's probably plugging into the router with a switch.

Routers with more than one "port" are actually routers with built-in switches.
The 4 port flavor is the most common.

Note that "daisy-chaining" switches does not necessarily
require setting up different subnets, as would daisy-chained routers
(with or without built-in switches).

A secondary router might have a subnet mask like:
255.255.255.224 , to allow 30 hosts (32 actual, you lose two)
But the primary router MUST be masked as 255.255.255.0,
unless you have a VERY WEIRD setup.
 

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As an adjunct: I have some bad news for you,
followed by worse news. :(

If you think numerical addressing is tough NOW,
under ipv4, just wait for the mandatory implementation
of ipv6, which is inevitable.

You see, when the internet was young,
the motto was: "if you build it, they will come".
Alas, today, the motto seems to be:
"if you own it, they will hack". :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It sounds as though there are two routers involved here-The Siemens and "...I have a network with an ADSL modem connecting to a router"
What's the make and model of the second router?
It is a Netgear WGT624

And about doing an IPCONFIG/ALL ... I dont feel safe about doing that and posting all my IP info on the net... so if you could tell me what information to look for I would feel safer with that.

If i connect directly to the netstreem the IP address shows up as 192.168.1.254

when I attach the Netgear it has an IP addrress of 192.168.0.1

Make sure to turn on "MAC cloning", as well, as it is off,
by default, on most Belkin and Linksys routers.
I have no idea what this is or what it does... couldnt find anything called it in the Netgear settings

Also, don't forget to add your modem's IP address to your routing table,
or it won't work... it'll just time out.
This sounds interesting... I have an area in my Netgear settings called static routes. Could this be where I enter the IP into the routing table? To add a static route I need to enter a Destination IP Address, IP Subnet Mask and then a Gateway IP address. I would assume the IP would be 192.168.1.254 and subnet would be 255.255.255.0 but what about the Gateway. I dont know about that.

Certain modems have DNS forwarding internally or provisionally disabled.
This was the case with me, when my home cable HSI provider had me hooked up with
a Toshiba modem. I swapped in a Motorola Surfboard 5120. Problem solved.
I think the DNS settings are configured in the SpeedStream modem/router by my ISP (they suppy it set up so you can plug and play)
 

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I have a similar setup.
In order to make it work:
I had to disable DHCP on the second router, assign it an address out of the range of the first router and use the LAN ports, not the WAN or internet port to connect the next computer.
There may be instructions on the Netgear site for this.
There's nothing in Ipconfig to worry about posting, and it would be useful info.
 

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There is nothing about an IPCONFIG display that is useful to any hacker. I don't really know what I specifically want to see all the time until I look over the whole display.
 

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L ... I dont feel safe about doing that and posting all my IP info on the net... so if you could tell me what information to look for I would feel safer with that.
You're kidding, right?
Your internet IP address is publicly available to any modern web browser, unless you
are using a chain of proxy servers (doubtful in your case)
If i connect directly to the netstreem the IP address shows up as 192.168.1.254
This is your modem's address, most likely. But it's on the LAN side of the builtt-in router,
and is NOT a public IP address, so no worry.
when I attach the Netgear it has an IP address of 192.168.0.1
Bingo! That's your router config page IP address.
It should open in your web browser, unless your firewall is misconfigured.

This sounds interesting... I have an area in my Netgear settings called static routes. Could this be where I enter the IP into the routing table?
Yes.

To add a static route I need to enter a Destination IP Address, IP Subnet Mask and then a Gateway IP address. I would assume the IP would be 192.168.1.254 and subnet would be 255.255.255.0 but what about the Gateway. I dont know about that.
In your case, the "default gateway should be
192.168.0.1
, since that is that is your router's IP address.

I think the DNS settings are configured in the SpeedStream modem/router by my ISP (they suppy it set up so you can plug and play)
No no no no no no,
these are on the internet side.
You tell your router to automatically find an IP address,
but use static routing on the LAN side.
You disable DNS on all your computers, but enable it on the router,
on the outbound side. You tell your ethernet switch to disable DNS.
This can be confusing, since most cheap routers have built-in 4-port switches
In short, you need to tell your router to disable DNS, but to find an internet IP
automatically. It sounds contradictory, but it's not. A router is just a bridge
with brains. The LAN side is private, while the IN (or WAN) side is public.

For simple internet connection sharing, the following instructions are not necessary.
But I run a DMZ behind my firewall, so I have to do the following, as well, using
IPX/SPX over NETBIOS:

Give each computer a unique name and IP address,
and make sure they are in the same workgroup,
if you want NETBIOS to work.
Statically route each computer, by assigning a unique IP address to each,
in "network and dialup settings" (I use Windows 2000; XP is similar).

Network Address Translation (NAT) takes care of the rest.

Am I making any sense?
 

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Ok, I checked a few sites, including Siemens, and this is a modem/router combo device. It's just an old model with a single LAN ethernet port. Plugging a router into that port means you're plugging a router into a router. Oddly enough, I actually do have a router plugged into another router. The first router in the line has two pc's and a network printer attached. The fourth port is for my Vonage adapter, which is also a four port router (no wireless, hence the need for the first wls router). Since your first router is just a single port, I wouldn't even mess with the configuration and instead just configure anything you want on the second router.
 
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