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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i work for a school and all of the heating / ac is controled by a program on my computer, if i have to call the tec guy to come fix a problem he get paid drive time.(witch is one hour + ) i heard that there is a way that i can set my computer so he can see what i am seeing from his computer(no drive time). i was told that is set up in xp and i have xp. what is this called and how do i do it. thank for any help . jim
 

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I believe that you can only view another PC with XP Pro. If I'm remembering this correctly, you can also use Virtual Network Computing (VNC). I use UltraVNC which is freeware that allows file transfer in addition to seeing the remote desktop.
 

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I second the recommendation for UltraVNC, it's what I use for remote support.
 

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I don't question the above advice for UltraVNC, but if you want to stick with just XP ...

For Remote Desktop you need to have XP Pro, and when the remote person logs on to your PC you will be logged off--you don't see what's happening.

Requesting Remote Assistance would probably be better for you. It works with Home and Pro; the remote person sees what you see; if you give the person permission he/she can then control (keyboard and mouse) your computer until you cut off the permission.
 

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Just another way is msn messenger offers the same thing for free,
Simply both log on to msn messenger, at the top of msn messenger you will see a little box with an arrow pointing down, click on that and select "actions" scroll down to "request remote assistance" then select the person who you want to ask foe remote assistance. that's it he now has control of your computer.
 

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schusterjo said:
Just another way is msn messenger offers the same thing for free,
Simply both log on to msn messenger, at the top of msn messenger you will see a little box with an arrow pointing down, click on that and select "actions" scroll down to "request remote assistance" then select the person who you want to ask foe remote assistance. that's it he now has control of your computer.
msn messenger uses the same engine for the remote desktop as the guys are talking about above. It's built into xp, not messenger.
 

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TerryNet said:
I don't question the above advice for UltraVNC, but if you want to stick with just XP ...

For Remote Desktop you need to have XP Pro, and when the remote person logs on to your PC you will be logged off--you don't see what's happening.

Requesting Remote Assistance would probably be better for you. It works with Home and Pro; the remote person sees what you see; if you give the person permission he/she can then control (keyboard and mouse) your computer until you cut off the permission.
so if i use xp pro i will not be able to see what is happening when the tech takes over? can i see what is happening if i use ultravnc? what if i am at home and no one is at the host computer can i control the host from my house with ultravnc ?
 

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stevetheman said:
msn messenger uses the same engine for the remote desktop as the guys are talking about above. It's built into xp, not messenger.
Whats your point? why make such a post? So what if I didn't go into "great detail"
Do you think they really care? I bet all they want is it to work and don't give a dang how or what just long as it works.
I said Just another way is msn messenger offers the same thing
???????? some people
so if i use xp pro i will not be able to see what is happening when the tech takes over? can i see what is happening if i use ultravnc? what if i am at home and no one is at the host computer can i control the host from my house with ultravnc ?
You should be able to to see what the tech is doing on the screen when he has control, If not something is wrong.

what if i am at home and no one is at the host computer can i control the host from my house with ultravnc
This I'm not 100% sure about this but I am almost positive there isn't anyway to do that. Unless there is somebody at both computers to allow the connection. one person must send a request and the other must accept the request at the other computer.
Now they do make a program that can do exactly what you ask, It called Goto my PC
Go to My PC
 

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can i see what is happening if i use ultravnc?
You can set it up to blank out the remote PC, but by default the remote PC will see everything being done remotely. You can set it up so you share the mouse and keyboard or disable the local inputs.
what if i am at home and no one is at the host computer can i control the host from my house with ultravnc ?
If UltraVNC is installed as a service and the PC is running (not in standby or hibernating) then you can control the PC whether or not anyone is there.
 

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I think that mattice06082 has given the straight scoop on using UltraVNC.

I am not pushing Remote Assistance, but want to clear up an apparent misconception.

If the remote helper uses a Remote Desktop connection, the client PC must be running XP Pro, the current user of the client will be logged off, and the client's screen will show nothing that is happening.

If the remote helper uses Remote Assistance the client PC may be XP Home or Pro, a user must be logged onto the client and present for some interactions to take place, and will be able to see everything that happens. And the user on the client PC gets to decide in real time whether the remote helper can take keyboard and mouse control.
 

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All of these suggestions are great, but keep in mind that you have to have connectivity to the computer in question. For example, if the technician is connecting from his network to a computer on your network, unless you have a VPN in place, you have to do the appropriate port forwarding. In the case of remote desktop, for example, it would be TCP port 3389.

If you do not object to paying a small fee, you could look into GoToMyPC. I believe that their service doesn't require any firewall configurations. There may be free alternatives available that work the same way, but I am not aware of any.

Again, if you have the connectivity in place, the suggestions previously posted are great ones.
 

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If you use Windows Messenger to request Remote Assistance the appropriate "holes" will be opened in XP's firewall and in your router. I can't answer your comparison question, because I've just dabbled a little in Remote Assistance and have never tried UltraVNC. Since the former is part of Windows, I would guess that UltraVNC is more user friendly. The following is something I prepared for some not-really-computer-literate people; it may be of help.

Remote Assistance Overview

This is a brief overview of using the Windows XP Remote Assistance feature through Windows Messenger. For more information, including other ways of initiating Remote Assistance, open the Help and Support Center and search for "Remote Assistance" (w/o the quotes).

With Remote Assistance the Helper can see the Requester's computer screen, and can take mouse and keyboard control of it if given permission. Each party has a "chat" type window that shows the status of the connection, has various controls and gives the opportunity to send Instant Messages.

Using Windows Messenger

If Windows Messenger is installed you will find it in the All Programs list. If you need to install: Control Panel - Add or Remove Programs - Add/Remove Windows Components - scroll to the bottom and put a checkmark in front of Windows Messenger. Click on Next, Apply and OK as necessary.

When you use Windows Messenger if you do not have a Microsoft .Net Passport (required) you will have a chance to register for one. If you have a Hotmail or MSN email account, all you have to do is register that and you are good to go.

Otherwise you can register with any email account. If you do this you will get an email with a link to click on to verify your email address; your .Net Passport registration is not complete until you do so.

If you do not have any email account, you can open a free one at www.hotmail.com or www.yahoo.com. With hotmail, note that you must visit it periodically or you lose it.

When you start to use Windows Messenger you will note that one of the options in the bottom part of the window is "Add a Contact." Use this to add (at least) <two names and email addresses were here>. We will then add you to our contact lists.

You'll be able to see who is online and send an Instant Message (IM) if desired.

Requesting Assistance

One way to request assistance is Start - Help and Support - and under "Ask for assistance" click on "Invite a friend to connect to your computer with Remote Assistance." Then "Invite someone to help you" and "Use Windows Messenger." The person you invite must be online; call the person and ask him/her to go online if necessary.

A second way is from the Windows Messenger window. Click on "Ask for Remote Assistance" in the "Actions" menu at the top or in the "more" list at the bottom. Again, the invitee must be online.

Expect to see a message that the invitation has been sent, and then a return message that the helper has agreed, and you are asked if you want to give access to your PC at this time. Respond "yes" and the session begins.

Use the "chat" window for communicating unless you are also on the phone. If the Helper wants to take control he/she will ask for it and you need to give permission. You can interrupt that control at any time.

Giving Assistance

If you are online (Windows Messenger) you may get a "popup" saying that somebody has requested your Remote Assistance. Respond "yes" and you should soon see the Requester's computer screen.

Use the "chat" window for communicating unless you are also on the phone. If you want to take control, there is an action to click on at the top of the "chat" window. The Requester will need to give permission.

Dial-up

If either party is using a Dial-up internet connection, the requestor should set the desktop color quality as low as possible to minimize the amount of information that must be sent. Right click on an empty part of the desktop - Properties - Settings tab; in the Color Quality drop down box set to the lowest (probably 16 bit) possible. Remember to click on Apply and OK as necessary.
 

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TerryNet said:
If you use Windows Messenger to request Remote Assistance the appropriate "holes" will be opened in XP's firewall and in your router.
While it will poke the appropriate holes in your Windows firewall, I don't believe it will do anything to your router unless you have enabled UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) in that router. I can assure you, if you sent a remote assistance request within my home network or corporate network, the hole would NOT be opened for that request to be carried out, at least not from outside the network.
 

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If you do not object to paying a small fee, you could look into GoToMyPC. I believe that their service doesn't require any firewall configurations. There may be free alternatives available that work the same way, but I am not aware of any.
I forgot that LogMeIn has a free account which does not require any port forwarding. The advantage that UltraVNC has over this is that it allows for file transfers. UltraVNC would require the PC running the server (the one receiving the remote assistance) to port forward port 5900 (default, but could be altered).
 

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we use a progrma called timbuktu pro to log in from home its really really good. don't know if its for sale to the general public though
 

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"I don't believe it will do anything to your router unless you have enabled UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) in that router."

Maybe it depends on the router? My router has always had UPnP disabled but Remote Assistance worked for me as I described. My guess was/is that whatever comes from the remote PC is a reply to a message sent from the requesting PC--thus the router waves it through as it does any other reply to something initiated from the LAN. I assume that's pretty much how Windows Messenger and other IM programs work--after I connect to the IM service I appear to get messages directly from a buddy, but really that message is coming as a "reply" to the connection request I initiated. (To whomever shoots holes in this, please note my use of "guess" and "assume.")
 
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