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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I accidently tried to plug the IDE cable on one of my hard drives in upside down and accidently broke off one of my pins. I took the hard drive to the local computer shop and they said that they couldn't fix it. I thought this was odd, so I searched on google and found a bunch of DIY options, such as this http://www.arem.us/stuff/hdd/

But I couldn't get it to work. Does anyone know of any way to fix my hard drive? Are there any repair places that can fix broken ide pins?

Thanks
 

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How you go about it depends on whether you want it repaired the right way, or just so you can get the data off the drive... and what type connector you have. But it is possible.

There are three types of connectors which can be purchased from places like Digikey and Newark In-One:
All 39 pins soldered on the side you can see (relatively easy to replace)
19 pins soldered on top and 20 soldered on the bottom (harder because you have to remove the board)
39 pins soldered through holes in the board (a ***** to replace)

If you are just interested in something that works you can solder a wire to the broken pin connection on the drive circuit board. And splice the other end into the appropriate wire on the IDE cable.

If you don't have soldering skills or don't know a friend who does, look in the phone book under "Electronic Equipment & Supplies-Wholesale & Manufacturers" and find a listing for "contract assembly" or something like that. (Realize, they'll expect to be paid whether it works or not).
 

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The easy way to solve this issue for a data recovery operation is to solder a wire onto the PCB contact for the connector, and connect it directly to the IDE connector pin in question. In the past, I've replaced the connector on a drive from a dead one, but that does require some soldering skills and the right equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All I want to do is to get the data off of it. I already have two other hard drives. If you hold the hard drive so that the non existent pin is facing up, the one that is broken is the one directly bottom right of it.

I've tried plugging it in to see if it still worked, but it would hang indefinitely while loading windows xp.
 

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Hi,

I'd suggest you only use the drive as a slave device to get the data off.

It is probably not worth the trouble trying to boot off the drive.

Install a new drive, install your O/S on it and then try and recover the data off the old drive.

The suggestions made should help.

From an old drive floppy. CD DVD or anything that is scrap. Use one of the pins soldered into a spare IDE cable in the correct place / location. With a very small blob of solder on the end of the pin it should make contact with what is left of the pin inside the drive connector. Even a straight bit of solid copper or steel wire would do.

On the drive connector on the actual hard drive you need to straighten and break off the rest of the bent pin leaving only enough to make contact with the bit of pin soldered into the IDE cable.

A data recovery company would find this a fairly easy recovery operation as bent pins are very common.

hth

Ceri
 

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My previous suggestion would be easiest for the less skilled at soldering. However, as I mentioned, I've replaced the whole connector on drives before.
 

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I once had an IDE cable without a slot thing on it. I couldn't work out for the life of me why this darn hard drive wouldn't power up!
Then it just clicked, turn it the other way up, idiot.

Good luck with the drive. I wonder why those tecchy guys couldn't do it...
 

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Attempting to solder a pin in a drive connector can be a daunting task, depending on the design of the connector. Some connectors have exposed connections, and some solder on both sides of the board. Others have hidden connections, which requires more work.
 
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